Grove Press is a hardcover and paperback imprint of Grove Atlantic, Inc. Grove Press was founded on Grove Street in New York’s Greenwich Village in 1947. But its true beginning came in 1951 when twenty-eight-year-old Barney Rossett, Jr. bought the company and turned it into one of the most influential publishers of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. From the outset, Rossett took chances: Grove published many of the Beats including William S. Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, and Allen Ginsberg. In addition, Grove Press became the preeminent publisher of twentieth-century drama in America, publishing the work of Samuel Beckett (Nobel Prize for Literature 1969), Bertold Brecht, Eugene Ionesco, David Mamet (Pulitzer Prize for Drama 1984), Harold Pinter (Nobel Prize for Literature 2005), Tom Stoppard, and many more. The press also introduced to American audiences the work of international authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Mikhail Bulgakov, Marguerite Duras, Jean Genet, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz (Nobel Prize for Literature 1990), Kenzaburo Oe (Nobel Prize for Literature 1994), Elfriede Jelinek (Nobel Prize for Literature 2004), Alain Robbe-Grillet, and Juan Rulfo. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Barney Rossett challenged the obscenity laws by publishing D. H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover and then Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer. His landmark court victories changed the American cultural landscape. Grove Press went on to publish literary erotic classics like The Story of O and ground-breaking gay fiction like John Rechy’s City of Night, as well as the works of the Marquis de Sade. On the political front, Grove Press published classics that include Franz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and Che Guevara’s The Bolivian Diary, among many other titles. In 1986, Barney Rosset sold the company and the press became part of Grove Weidenfeld. In 1993 that company was merged with Atlantic Monthly Press to form Grove Atlantic, Inc.

Since 1993, Grove Press has been both a hardcover and paperback imprint of Grove Atlantic publishing fiction, drama, poetry, literature in translation, and general nonfiction. Authors and titles include Jon Lee Anderson’s Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, Robert Olen Butler’s A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain (Pulitzer Prize for Literature 1993), Kiran Desai’s Inheritance of Loss (Man Booker Prize 2006), Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book of Fish (Commonwealth Prize 2002), Ismail Kadare’s The Siege, Jerzy Kosinski’s Steps (National Book Award 1969), Jacqueline Susann’s Valley of the Dolls, Nick McDonell’s Twelve, Catherine Millet’s The Sexual Life of Catherine M., Pascal Mercier’s Night Train to Lisbon, Kay Ryan (Poet Laureate of the United States 2008/9) as well as Antonio Lobo Antunes, Will Self, Barry Hannah, Terry Southern, and many others.

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Lions by Bonnie Nadzam
Lions

“A truly American fairytale. . . .
on love, loyalty, and ambition.”
Booklist


“[A] story of haunted histories and broken promises.”
—O, The Oprah Magazine, a "Must-Read Book of the Summer"

“Masterfully crafted and pitch perfect.”—Chris Abani

“Mesmerizing.”
—Publishers Weekly
Forty Thieves by Thomas Perry
Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes
 
Reading Group & Teacher's Guides
reading group guide available

A Confederacy of Dunces
by John Kennedy Toole
A Confederacy of Dunces is an American comic masterpiece that outswifts Swift, whose poem gives the book its title. Set in New Orleans, the novel bursts into life on Canal Street under the clock at D. H. Holmes department store. The characters leave the city and literature forever marked by their presences—Ignatius and his mother; Mrs. Reilly’s matchmaking friend, Santa Battaglia; Miss Trixie, the octogenarian assistant accountant at Levy Pants; inept, bemused Patrolman Mancuso; Jones, the jivecat in spaceage dark glasses. Juvenal, Rabelais, Cervantes, Fielding, Swift, Dickens—their spirits are all here. Filled with unforgettable characters and unbelievable plot twists, shimmering with intelligence, and dazzling in its originality, Toole’s comic classic just keeps getting better year after year.

reading group guide available

Cold Mountain
A Novel
by Charles Frazier
In 1997, Charles Frazier’s debut novel Cold Mountain made publishing history when it sailed to the top of The New York Times best-seller list for sixty-one weeks, won numerous literary awards, including the National Book Award, and went on to sell over three million copies. Now, the beloved American epic returns, reissued by Grove Press to coincide with the publication of Frazier’s eagerly-anticipated second novel, Thirteen Moons. Sorely wounded and fatally disillusioned in the fighting at Petersburg, a Confederate soldier named Inman decides to walk back to his home in the Blue Ridge mountains to Ada, the woman he loves. His trek across the disintegrating South brings him into intimate and sometimes lethal converse with slaves and marauders, bounty hunters and witches, both helpful and malign. At the same time, the intrepid Ada is trying to revive her father’s derelict farm and learning to survive in a world where the old certainties have been swept away. As it interweaves their stories, Cold Mountain asserts itself as an authentic odyssey, hugely powerful, majestically lovely, and keenly moving.

reading group guide available

Peace Like a River
by Leif Enger

“Reminds us why we read fiction to begin with: to commune with a vividly, lovingly rendered world, to lose ourselves in story and language and beauty, to savor what we don’t want to end yet know must.”—The San Francisco Chronicle. Young Reuben Land has little doubt that miracles happen all around us, suspecting that his own father is touched by God. When his older brother flees a controversial murder charge, Reuben, along with his older sister and father, set off on a journey that will take them to the Badlands and through a landscape more extraordinary than they could have anticipated. Enger’s novel is at once a heroic quest and a haunting meditation on the possibility of magic in the everyday world.


teacher's guide available

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead
by Tom Stoppard

When Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead first opened,
Tom Stoppard was catapulted into the front ranks of modem playwrights overnight.


Acclaimed as a modern dramatic masterpiece, Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead is the fabulously inventive tale of Hamlet as told from the worm’s-eve view of the bewildered Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, two minor characters in Shakespeare’s play. In Tom Stoppard’s best-known work, this Shakespearean Laurel and Hardy finally get a chance to take the lead role, but do so in a world where echoes of Waiting for Godot resound, where reality and illusion intermix, and where fate leads our two heroes to a tragic but inevitable end.


teacher's guide available

Waiting for Godot
A Tragicomedy in Two Acts
by Samuel Beckett

From an inauspicious beginning at the tiny Left Bank Theatre de Babylone in 1953, followed by bewilderment by American and British audiences, Waiting for Godot has become one of the most important and enigmatic plays of the past fifty years and a cornerstone of twentieth-century drama. Now in honor of the centenary of Samuel Beckett’s birth, Grove Press is publishing a bilingual edition of the play. Originally written in French, Beckett translated the work himself, and in doing so chose to revise and eliminate various passages. With side-by-side text the reader can experience the mastery of Beckett’s language and explore the nuances of his creativity. Upon being asked who Godot is, Samuel Beckett told Alan Schneider, “If I knew, I would have said so in the play.” Although we may never know who we are waiting for, in this special edition we can rediscover one of the most magical and beautiful allegories of our time.


reading group guide available

The Inheritance of Loss
by Kiran Desai

Published to extraordinary acclaim, The Inheritance of Loss heralds Kiran Desai as one of our most insightful novelists. She illuminates the pain of exile and the ambiguities of postcolonialism with a tapestry of colorful characters: an embittered old judge; Sai, his sixteen-year-old orphaned granddaughter; a chatty cook; and the cook’s son, Biju, who is hopscotching from one miserable New York restaurant to another, trying to stay a step ahead of the INS. When a Nepalese insurgency in the mountains threatens Sai’s new-sprung romance with her handsome tutor, their lives descend into chaos. The cook witnesses India’s hierarchy being overturned and discarded. The judge revisits his past and his role in Sai and Biju’s intertwining lives. A story of depth and emotion, hilarity and imagination, The Inheritance of Loss tells “of love, longing, futility, and loss that is Desai’s true territory” (O: The Oprah Magazine).


reading group guide available

The Gathering
by Anne Enright

Anne Enright is a dazzling writer of international stature and one of Ireland’s most singular voices.  Now she delivers The Gathering, a moving, evocative portrait of a large Irish family and a shot of fresh blood into the Irish literary tradition, combining the lyricism of the old with the shock of the new.  The nine surviving children of the Hegarty clan are gathering in Dublin for the wake of their wayward brother, Liam, drowned in the sea. His sister, Veronica, collects the body and keeps the dead man company, guarding the secret she shares with him—something that happened in their grandmother’s house in the winter of 1968. As Enright traces the line of betrayal and redemption through three generations her distinctive intelligence twists the world a fraction and gives it back to us in a new and unforgettable light. The Gathering is a daring, witty, and insightful family epic, clarified through Anne Enright’s unblinking eye. It is a novel about love and disappointment, about how memories warp and secrets fester, and how fate is written in the body, not in the stars.


reading group guide available

This Boy's Life
A Memoir
by Tobias Wolff
This unforgettable memoir of boyhood in the 1950s, a true modern classic, introduces us to the young Toby Wolff, by turns tough and vulnerable, crafty and bumbling. Separated by divorce from his father and brother, Toby and his mother are constantly on the move. As he fights for identity and self-respect against the unrelenting hostility of a new stepfather, his experiences are at once poignant and comical, and Wolff masterfully re-creates the frustrations, cruelties, and joys of adolescence. His various schemes—running away to Alaska, forging checks, and stealing cars—lead eventually to an act of outrageous self-invention that releases him into a new world of possibility. “So absolutely clear and hypnotic . . . that a reader wants to take it apart and find some simple way to describe why it works so beautifully.”—The New York Times

reading group guide available

Euphoria
by Lily King
From New England Book Award winner Lily King comes a breathtaking novel about three young anthropologists of the 1930s caught in a passionate love triangle that threatens their bonds, their ca­­reers, and, ultimately, their lives.

English anthropologist Andrew Banson has been alone in the field for several years, studying the Kiona river tribe in the Territory of New Guinea. Haunted by the memory of his brothers’ deaths and increasingly frustrated and isolated by his research, Bankson is on the verge of suicide when a chance encounter with colleagues, the controversial Nell Stone and her wry and mercurial Australian husband, Fen, pulls him back from the brink. Nell and Fen have just fled the bloodthirsty Mumbanyo and, in spite of Nell’s poor health, are hungry for a new discovery. When Bankson finds them a new tribe nearby, the artistic, female-dominated Tam, he ignites an intellectual and romantic firestorm between the three of them that burns out of anyone’s control.

Set between two world wars and inspired by events in the life of revolutionary anthropologist Margaret Mead, Euphoria is an enthralling story of passion, possession, exploration, and sacrifice from accomplished author Lily King.


reading group guide available

The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven
by Sherman Alexie

When it was first published in 1993, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven established Sherman Alexie as a stunning new talent of American letters. The basis for the award-winning movie Smoke Signals, it remains one of his most beloved and widely praised books. In this darkly comic collection, Alexie brilliantly weaves memory, fantasy, and stark realism to paint a complex, grimly ironic portrait of life in and around the Spokane Indian Reservation. These twenty-two interlinked tales are narrated by characters raised on humiliation and government-issue cheese, and yet are filled with passion and affection, myth and dream. Against a backdrop of alcohol, car accidents, laughter, and basketball, Alexie depicts the distances between Indians and whites, reservation Indians and urban Indians, men and women, and, most poetically, modern Indians and the traditions of the past.


reading group guide available

Flight
by Sherman Alexie
The best-selling author of multiple award-winning books returns with his first novel in ten years, a powerful, fast, and timely story of a troubled foster teenager—a boy who is not a “legal” Indian because he was never claimed by his father—who learns the true meaning of terror. About to commit a devastating act, the young man finds himself shot back in time on a shocking sojourn through moments of violence in American history. He resurfaces in the form of an FBI agent during the civil rights era, inhabits the body of an Indian child during the battle at Little Bighorn, and then rides with an Indian tracker in the nineteenth century before materializing as an airline pilot jetting through the skies today. When finally, blessedly, our young warrior comes to rest again in his own contemporary body, he is mightily transformed by all he’s seen. This is Sherman Alexie at his most brilliant—making us laugh while breaking our hearts. Simultaneously wrenching and deeply humorous, wholly contemporary yet steeped in American history, Flight is irrepressible, fearless, and again, groundbreaking Alexie.

reading group guide available

H Is for Hawk
by Helen Macdonald
When Helen Macdonald’s father died suddenly on a London street, she was devastated. An experienced falconer—Helen had been captivated by hawks since childhood—she’d never before been tempted to train one of the most vicious predators, the goshawk. But in her grief, she saw that the goshawk’s fierce and feral temperament mirrored her own. Resolving to purchase and raise the deadly creature as a means to cope with her loss, she adopted Mabel, and turned to the guidance of The Once and Future King author T.H. White's chronicle The Goshawk to begin her challenging endeavor. Projecting herself “in the hawk's wild mind to tame her” tested the limits of Macdonald’s humanity and changed her life.

Heart-wrenching and humorous, this book is an unflinching account of bereavement and a unique look at the magnetism of an extraordinary beast, with a parallel examination of a legendary writer’s eccentric falconry. Obsession, madness, memory, myth, and history combine to achieve a distinctive blend of nature writing and memoir from an outstanding literary innovator.



reading group guide available

Matterhorn
A Novel of the Vietnam War
by Karl Marlantes
Intense, powerful, and compelling, Matterhorn is an epic war novel in the tradition of Norman Mailer’s The Naked and the Dead and James Jones’s The Thin Red Line. It is the timeless story of a young Marine lieutenant, Waino Mellas, and his comrades in Bravo Company, who are dropped into the mountain jungle of Vietnam as boys and forced to fight their way into manhood. Standing in their way are not merely the North Vietnamese but also monsoon rain and mud, leeches and tigers, disease and malnutrition. Almost as daunting, it turns out, are the obstacles they discover between each other: racial tension, competing ambitions, and duplicitous superior officers. But when the company finds itself surrounded and outnumbered by a massive enemy regiment, the Marines are thrust into the raw and all-consuming terror of combat. The experience will change them forever.
     Written by a highly decorated Marine veteran over the course of thirty years, Matterhorn is a spellbinding and unforgettable novel that brings to life an entire world—both its horrors and its thrills—and seems destined to become a classic of combat literature.


reading group guide available

Broken for You
by Stephanie Kallos
With a riotous energy that recalls the works of John Irving and Anne Tyler, Broken for You is a debut novel of infinite charm and tremendous heart that explores the risks and rewards of human connection, and the hidden strength behind things that only seem fragile. When we meet septuagenarian Margaret Hughes, she is living alone in a mansion in Seattle with only a massive collection of valuable antiques for company. Enter Wanda Schultz, a young woman with a broken heart who has come west to search for her wayward boyfriend. Both women are guarding dark secrets and have spent many years building up protective armor against the outside world. But as the two begin their tentative dance of friendship, the armor begins to fall away and Margaret opens her house to Wanda.  Along the way, a famous mosaic artist is born, a Holocaust survivor is reunited with her long-lost tea set, and a sad-eyed drifter finds his long-lost daughter. Funny, heartbreaking, and alive with a potpourri of eccentric and irresistible characters, Broken for You is a testament to the saving graces of surrogate families, and shows how far the tiniest repair jobs can go in righting the world’s wrongs.

reading group guide available

The Subterraneans
by Jack Kerouac
Written over the course of three days and three nights, The Subterraneans was generated out of the same kind of ecstatic flash of inspiration that produced another one of Kerouac's early classics, On The Road. Centering around the tempestuous breakup of Leo Percepied and Mardou Fox—two denizens of the 1950s San Francisco underground—The Subterraneans is a tale of dark alleys and smoky rooms, of artists, visionaries, and adventurers existing outside mainstream America's field of vision.



reading group guide available

The Master and Margarita
by Mikhail Bulgakov
Suppressed in the Soviet Union for twenty-six years, Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece is an ironic parable of power and its corruption, good and evil, and human frailty and the strength of love. Featuring Satan, accompanied by a retinue that includes the large, fast-talking, vodka drinking black tom cat Behemoth, the beautiful Margarita, her beloved—a distraught writer known only as the Master—Pontius Pilate, and Jesus Christ, The Master and Margarita combines fable, fantasy, political satire, and slapstick comedy into a wildly entertaining and unforgettable tale that is commonly considered one of the greatest novels ever to come out of the Soviet Union.

reading group guide/teacher's guide available

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit
by Jeanette Winterson

When it first appeared, Jeanette Winterson's extraordinary debut novel received unanimous international praise, including the prestigious Whitbread Prize for best first fiction. Winterson has gone on to fulfill that promise, winning the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and producing some of the most dazzling and admired novels of the past decade. Now required reading in contemporary literature, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a funny, poignant exploration of a young girl's quirky adolescence.


teacher's guide available

Galileo
by Bertolt Brecht

Considered by many to be one of Brecht’s masterpieces, Galileo explores the question of a scientist’s social and ethical responsibility, as the brilliant Galileo must choose between his life and his life’s work when confronted with the demands of the Inquisition. Through the dramatic characterization of the famous physicist, Brecht examines the issues of scientific morality and the difficult relationship between the intellectual and authority.

This version of the play is the famous one that was brought to completion by Brecht himself, working with Charles Laughton, who played Galileo in the first two American productions (Hollywood and New York, 1947). Since then the play has become a classic in the world repertoire.


reading group guide available

The Sympathizer
by Viet Thanh Nguyen
A profound, startling, and beautifully crafted debut novel, The Sympathizer is the story of a man of two minds, someone whose political beliefs clash with his individual loyalties. In dialogue with but diametrically opposed to the narratives of the Vietnam War that have preceded it, this novel offers an important and unfamiliar new perspective on the war: that of a conflicted communist sympathizer.

It is April 1975, and Saigon is in chaos. At his villa, a general of the South Vietnamese army is drinking whiskey and, with the help of his trusted captain, drawing up a list of those who will be given passage aboard the last flights out of the country. The general and his compatriots start a new life in Los Angeles, unaware that one among their number, the captain, is secretly observing and reporting on the group to a higher-up in the Viet Cong. The Sympathizer is the story of this captain: a man brought up by an absent French father and a poor Vietnamese mother, a man who went to university in America, but returned to Vietnam to fight for the Communist cause. Viet Thanh Nguyen’s astonishing novel takes us inside the mind of this double agent, a man whose lofty ideals necessitate his betrayal of the people closest to him. A gripping spy novel, an astute exploration of extreme politics, and a moving love story, The Sympathizer explores a life between two worlds and examines the legacy of the Vietnam War in literature, film, and the wars we fight today.


reading group guide available

Jasmine
by Bharati Mukherjee
One of the best-loved novels from a writer of richness and significance, Jasmine has been acclaimed by the Los Angeles Times Book Review as "artful and arresting . . . breathtaking . . . [Mukherjee] marks with unsparing brilliance the symptoms of a new Third World." When Jasmine is suddenly widowed at seventeen, she seems fated to a life of quiet isolation in the small Indian village where she was born. But the force of Jasmine's desires propels her explosively into a larger, more dangerous, and ultimately more life-giving world. In just a few years, Jasmine becomes Jane Ripplemeyer, happily pregnant by a middle-aged Iowa banker and the adoptive mother of a Vietnamese refugee. Jasmine's metamorphosis, with its sudden upheavals and its slow evolutionary steps, illuminates the making of an American mind; but even more powerfully, her story depicts the shifting contours of an America being transformed by her and others like her—our new neighbors, friends, and lovers. In Jasmine, Bharati Mukherjee has created a heroine as exotic and unexpected as the many worlds in which she lives.


reading group guide available

Triangle
The Fire That Changed America
by David Von Drehle

“Sure to become the definitive account of the fire. . . . Triangle is social history at its best, a magnificent portrayal not only of the catastrophe but also of the time and the turbulent city in which it took place.” —The New York Times Book Review

Triangle is a poignantly detailed account of the 1911 disaster that horrified the country and changed the course of twentieth-century politics and labor relations.  On March 25, 1911, as workers were getting ready to leave for the day, a fire broke out in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory in New York’s Greenwich Village. Within minutes it spread to consume the building’s upper three stories.  Firemen who arrived at the scene were unable to rescue those trapped inside: their ladders simply weren’t tall enough. People on the street watched in horror as desperate workers jumped to their deaths. The final toll was 146 people—123 of them women. It was the worst disaster in New York City history.  Triangle is a vibrant and immensely moving account that Bob Woodward calls, “A riveting history written with flare and precision.”


reading group guide available

Night Train to Lisbon
A Novel
by Pascal Mercier

A huge international best seller embraced by American booksellers, critics, and readers, Night Train to Lisbon went into four hardcover printings that confirmed its place as one of the most appealing European novels of recent years.
Raimund Gregorius teaches classical languages at a Swiss lycée, and lives a life governed by routine. One day, a chance encounter with an enigmatic Portuguese woman inspires him to question his life—and leads him to an extraordinary book that will open the possibility of changing his existence. He takes the train to Lisbon that same night, and with him the words of Amadeu de Prado, a doctor whose practice and principles led him into confrontation with Salazar’s dictatorship, and a man whose intelligence and magnetism left a mark on everyone who met him. As Gregorius unlocks the mystery of who Prado was, an extraordinary tale takes shape, centered on a group of people working in utmost secrecy to fight dictatorship, and the betrayals that threaten to expose them.
A richly layered international bestseller propelled by the mystery at its heart, Night Train to Lisbon is a haunting tale of repression, resistance, and the universal human struggle to connect.


reading group guide available

The Toughest Indian in the World
by Sherman Alexie
Sherman Alexie has been acclaimed by Time as “one of the better new novelists, Indian or otherwise,” and his books have been compared to those of Richard Wright and James Baldwin in their immense lyric power and revolutionary spirit. Now, Sherman Alexie gives us his first new collection since the best-selling The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven.

In these stories, we meet the kinds of American Indians we rarely see in literature—the upper and middle class, the professionals and white-collar workers, the bureaucrats and poets, falling in and out of love and wondering if they will make their way home. A Spokane Indian journalist transplanted from the reservation to the city picks up a hitchhiker, a Lummi boxer looking to take on the toughest Indian in the world. A Spokane son waits for his diabetic father to return from the hospital, listening to his father’s friends argue over Jesus’ carpentry skills as they build a wheelchair ramp. An estranged interracial couple, separated in the midst of a traffic accident, rediscover their love for each other. A white drifter holds up an International House of Pancakes, demanding a dollar per customer and someone to love, and emerges with forty-two dollars and an overweight Indian he dubs Salmon Boy.

Sherman Alexie’s is a voice of remarkable passion, and these stories are love stories—between parents and children, white people and Indians, movie stars and ordinary people. Witty, tender, and fierce, The Toughest Indian in the World is a virtuoso performance by one of the country’s finest writers.


reading group guide available

Ten Little Indians
by Sherman Alexie

Sherman Alexie is one of our most acclaimed and popular writers today. With Ten Little Indians, he offers nine poignant and emotionally resonant new stories about Native Americans who, like all Americans, find themselves at personal and cultural crossroads, faced with heartrending, tragic, sometimes wondrous moments of being that test their loyalties, their capacities, and their notions of who they are and who they love.
In Alexie’s first story, “The Search Engine,” Corliss is a rugged and resourceful student who finds in books the magic she was denied while growing up poor. In “The Life and Times of Estelle Walks Above,” an intellectual feminist Spokane Indian woman saves the lives of dozens of white women all around her to the bewilderment of her only child. “What You Pawn I Will Redeem” starts off with a homeless man recognizing in a pawn shop window the fancy-dance regalia that was stolen fifty years earlier from his late grandmother.
Even as they often make us laugh, Alexie’s stories are driven by a haunting lyricism and naked candor that cut to the heart of the human experience, shedding brilliant light on what happens when we grow into and out of each other.


reading group guide available

Wish You Were Here
by Stewart O'Nan

“Riveting. . . . O’Nan has written the perfect summer-by-the-lake read. . . . This is the landscape of family Jonathan Franzen illuminates in The Corrections, or Jane Smiley in Ordinary Love.” —The Chicago Tribune

Award-winning writer Stewart O’Nan has been acclaimed by critics as one of the most accomplished novelists writing today. Now comes “his most complete work to date, filled with the type of life lessons that the best fiction has to offer and from an author firmly in
control of his art” (Orlando Sentinel). A year after the death of her husband, Henry, Emily Maxwell gathers her family by Lake Chautauqua in western New York for what will be a last vacation at their summer cottage.  Memories of past summers resurface, old rivalries flare up, and love is rekindled and born anew, resulting in a timeless novel that “succeeds beautifully . . . showcases some of the finest character studies a contemporary reader could ask for” (The Boston Globe).


teacher's guide available

Mother Courage and Her Children
A Chronicle of the Thirty Years' War
by Bertolt Brecht

Widely considered one of the great dramatic creations of the modem stage, Mother Courage and Her Children is Bertolt Brecht’s most passionate and profound statement against war. Set in the seventeenth century, the play follows Anna Fierling (“Mother Courage”), an itinerant trader, as she pulls her wagon of wares and her children through the blood and carnage of Europe’s religious wars. Battered by hardships, brutality, and the degradation and death of her children, she ultimately finds herself alone with the one thing in which she truly believes—her ramshackle wagon with its tattered flag and freight of boots and brandy. Fitting herself in its harness, the old woman manages, with the last of her strength, to drag it onward to the next battle. In the enduring figure of Mother Courage, Bertolt Brecht has created one of the most extraordinary characters in literature.


teacher's guide available

A Personal Matter
by Kenzaburo Oe

Kenzaburo Oe, the winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize for Literature, is internationally acclaimed as one of the most important and influential post-World War II writers, known for his powerful accounts of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and his own struggle to come to terms with a mentally handicapped son. The Swedish Academy lauded Oe for his "poetic force [that] creates an imagined world where life and myth condense to form a disconcerting picture of the human predicament today." His most popular book, A Personal Matter is the story of Bird, a frustrated intellectual in a failing marriage whose Utopian dream is shattered when his wife gives birth to a brain-damaged child.


reading group guide available

Twelve
A Novel
by Nick McDonell
Creating a sensation around the world, Twelve established its seventeen-year-old author as a powerful voice of the new millennium.  Set among the privileged prep-school students of Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Twelve follows White Mike, a dropout drug dealer, through the week between Christmas and New Year’s 1999. Twelve is not a coming-of-age story, because its kids never had a childhood. From page one, the pace is set toward an apocalyptic climax—there is an excess of everything but hope, we are filled with that very emotion as White Mike struggles for nothing less than his soul. Twelve is “a beautifully tragic and unsettling story . . . a reminder of how engrossing a character-driven novel can, and should, be” (Orlando Sentinel).

reading group guide available

Moon Tiger
by Penelope Lively
Penelope Lively won Britain's prestigious Booker Prize for this deeply moving, elegantly structured novel.  Elderly, uncompromising Claudia Hampton lies in a London hospital bed with memories of life fluttering through her fading consciousness. An author of popular history, Claudia proclaims she's carrying out her last project: a history of the world. This history turns out to be a mosaic of her life, her own story tangled with those of her brother, her lover and father of her daughter, and the center of her life, Tom, her one great love found and lost in war-torn Egypt. Always the independent woman, often with contentious relationships, Claudia's personal history is complex and fascinating. As people visit Claudia, they shake and twist the mosaic, changing speed, movement, and voice, to reveal themselves and Claudia's impact on their world.

reading group guide available

City of Night
by John Rechy
When John Rechy’s explosive first novel—now a classic—appeared in 1963, it became a national best-seller and ushered in a new era of gay fiction. Bold and inventive in his account of the urban underworld of male prostitution, Rechy is equally unflinching in his portrayal of one hustling “youngman” and his search for self-knowledge within the neon-lit world of hustlers, drag queens, and men on every kind of make. As the narrator moves from El Paso to Times Square, from Pershing Square to the French Quarter, we get an unforgettable look at life on the edge.

teacher's guide available

Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea
The History and Discovery of the World's Richest Shipwreck
by Gary Kinder

Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea tells the story of the sinking of the SS Central America, a side-wheel steamer carrying nearly six hundred passengers returning from the California Gold Rush, two hundred miles off the Carolina coast in September 1857. Over four hundred lives and twenty-one tons of California gold were lost. It was the worst peacetime disaster at sea in American history, a tragedy that remained lost in legend for over a century. In the 1980s, a young engineer from Ohio set out to do what no one, not even the United States Navy, had been able to do: establish a working presence on the deep-ocean floor and open it to science, archaeology, history, medicine, and recovery. The SS Central America became the target of his project. After years of intensive efforts, Tommy Thompson and the Columbus-America Discovery Group found the SS Central America in eight thousand feet of water, and in October 1989 they sailed into Norfolk with her recovered treasure: gold coins, bars, nuggets, and dust, plus steamer trunks filled with period clothes, newspapers, books, and journals. Gary Kinder tells this extraordinary tale of history, human drama, heroic rescue, scientific ingenuity, and individual courage.


reading group guide available

The Weather Makers
How Man Is Changing the Climate and What It Means for Life on Earth
by Tim Flannery

“At last, here is a clear and readable account of one of the most important but controversial issues facing everyone in the world today.  If you are not already addicted to Tim Flannery's writing, discover him now: The Weathermakers is his best book yet.” —Jared Diamond, author of Collapse and Guns, Germs & Steel

Sometime this century the day will arrive when the human influence on the climate will overwhelm all other natural factors. Over the past decade, the world has seen the most powerful El Niño ever recorded, the most devastating hurricane in two hundred years, the hottest European summer on record, and one of the worst storm seasons ever experienced in Florida. With one out of every five living things on this planet committed to extinction by the levels of greenhouse gases that will accumulate in the next few decades, we are reaching a global climatic tipping point. The Weather Makers is both an urgent warning and a call to arms, outlining the history of climate change, how it will unfold over the next century, and what we can do to prevent a cataclysmic future. Along with a riveting history of climate change, Tim Flannery offers specific suggestions for action for both lawmakers and individuals, from investing in renewable power sources like wind, solar, and geothermal energy, to offering an action plan with steps each and every one of us can take right now to reduce deadly CO2 emissions by as much as 70 percent.


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Kitchen
by Banana Yoshimoto
Banana Yoshimoto’s novels have created a sensation in Japan and all over the world. With the publication of Kitchen, the dazzling English-language debut that is still her best-loved book, the literary world realized that Yoshimoto was a young writer of enduring talent whose work has quickly earned a place among the best of contemporary Japanese literature. Kitchen is an enchantingly original book that juxtaposes two tales about mothers, love, tragedy, and the power of the kitchen and home in the lives of a pair of free-spirited young women in contemporary Japan. Mikage, the heroine of “Kitchen,” is an orphan raised by her grandmother, who has passed away. Grieving, Mikage is taken in by her friend Yoichi and his mother (who is really his cross-dressing father) Eriko. As the three of them form an improvised family that soon weathers its own tragic losses, Yoshimoto spins a lovely, evocative tale with the kitchen and the comforts of home at its heart. In a whimsical style that recalls the early Marguerite Duras, “Kitchen” and its companion story, “Moonlight Shadow,” are elegant tales whose seeming simplicity is the ruse of a very special writer whose voice echoes in the mind and the soul.

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World Made by Hand
A Novel
by James Howard Kunstler

In The Long Emergency celebrated social commentator James Howard Kunstler explored how the terminal decline of oil production, combined with climate change, had the potential to put industrial civilization out of business. In World Made by Hand, an astonishing work of speculative fiction, Kunstler brings to life what America might be, a few decades hence, after these catastrophes converge. For the townspeople of Union Grove, New York, the future is nothing like they thought it would be. Transportation is slow and dangerous, so food is grown locally at great expense of time and energy, and the outside world is largely unknown. There may be a president, and he may be in Minneapolis now, but people aren’t sure. Their challenges play out in a dazzling, fully realized world of abandoned highways and empty houses, horses working the fields and rivers, no longer polluted, and replenished with fish. With the cost of oil skyrocketing—and with it the price of food—Kunstler’s extraordinary book, full of love and loss, violence and power, sex and drugs, depression and desperation, but also plenty of hope, is more relevant than ever.


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The Secret River
by Kate Grenville

“Absorbing . . . Americans will find Grenville’s eloquent pioneer story—pitting natives against European settlers—at once foreign and stunningly familiar. A” —Entertainment Weekly (an EW Pick)

A Booker Prize finalist and Commonwealth Prize winner, author Kate Grenville recalls her family’s history in an astounding novel about the pioneers of New South Wales. A best seller in Australia, The Secret River is the story of William Thornhill, is deported to the New South Wales colony in what would become Australia in 1806. In this new world of convicts and charlatans, Thornhill tries to pull his family into a position of power and comfort. When he rounds a bend in the Hawkesbury River and sees a gentle slope of land, he becomes determined to make the place his own. But, as uninhabited as the island appears, Australia is full of native people, and they do not take kindly to Thornhill’s theft of their home. The Secret River is the tale of Thornhill’s deep love for his small corner of the new world, and his slow realization that if he wants to settle there, he must ally himself with the most despicable of the white settlers, and to keep his family safe, he must permit terrifying cruelty to come to innocent people.


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In the Fall
by Jeffrey Lent

"You can hear the echoes of Faulkner and Cormac McCarthy in Lent's prose. But the presiding geniuses of this dark novel . . . are Robert Frost and the artist Winslow Homer . . . flint-eyed Yankees who never saw a paradise that didn't have a snake."—Newsweek

In the Fall
is an extraordinary epic of three generations of an American family, the dark secrets that blister at its core, and the transcendent bonds between men and women that fuel their lives over the course of six decades.


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An Unnecessary Woman
by Rabih Alameddine

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Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids
by Kenzaburo Oe

Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids recounts the exploits of fifteen teenage reformatory boys evacuated to a remote mountain village in wartime, where they are feared and detested by the local peasants. When plague breaks out, the villagers flee, blockading the boys inside the deserted town. Their brief attempt to build autonomous lives of self-respect, love, and tribal valor is doomed in the face of death and the adult nightmare of war.


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Artemisia
by Alexandra Lapierre
In this heroic, passionate story, Alexandra Lapierre sweeps her audience through the streets once frequented by Caravaggio, Velasquez, and Van Dyck and the studios of artists who used their daggers as efficiently as their brushes. Born to the artist Orazio Gentileschi at the beginning of the 1600s, when artists were the celebrities of the day, Artemisia was apprenticed to her father at an early age. She showed such remarkable talent that he came to view her as the most precious thing he owned.  This is a story of the love-hate relationship between master and pupil, father and daughter, at a time when daughters belonged to their fathers and had no legal rights.  Lapierre brings Artemisia Gentileschi to vivid life as she tells of the emotional struggles of this remarkable, fascinating woman.

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Nine Plays of the Modern Theatre
Brecht: The Caucasian Chalk Circle; Beckett: Waiting for Godot; Durrenmatt: The Visit; Genet: The Balcony; Pinter: The Birthday Party; Ionesco: Rhinoceros; Mrozek: Tango; Stoppard: Rosencrantz and Gui
by Harold Clurman

A comprehensive volume that contains nine of the most important, most indispensable plays of the modern theater.

What Harold Clurman has done in this seminal collection is to create for us a portrait of the progress and turmoil of the twentieth century. Ranging from the eerie realism of Pinter’s sinister Birthday Party, to the absurd literalism of Ionesco’s conformist city in Rhinoceros, to the baroque fantasy world of Genet’s brothel in The Balcony, to the tragic hilarity of Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, these nine plays, each entirely distinct, together form an incisive, compelling, and sometimes heartbreaking mosaic of our time.


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Sexing the Cherry
by Jeanette Winterson
Jeanette Winterson’s dazzling novels have earned her widespread and unanimous international acclaim, establishing her as a major figure in world literature. Sexing the Cherry is an imaginative tour de force exploring history, imagination, and the nature of time. In a fantastic world that is and is not seventeenth–century England, a baby is found floating in the Thames. The child is rescued by the Dog Woman, a murderous gentle giant who names her newfound trophy Jordan and takes him out for walks on a leash. When he grows up Jordan, like Gulliver, travels the world, but finds that the strangest wonders are spun out of his own head. The strangest wonder of all is Time. Does it exist? What is its nature? Why does every journey conceal another journey within its lines? What is the difference between seventeenth–century Jordan and twentieth–century Nicholas Jordan, a navel cadet in a warship? And who are the Twelve Dancing Princesses? With a story full of shimmering epiphanies, Jeanette Winterson again demonstrates the keenness of her craft and the singularity of her vision.

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The People's Act of Love
by James Meek


In a remote Siberian village, amid a lawless, unforgiving landscape, lives Anna Petrovna, a beautiful, willfully self-reliant widowed mother. A mystical, separatist Christian sect, a stranded regiment of restless Czech soldiers, and an eerie local shaman live nearby, all struggling against the elements and great social upheaval to maintain a fragile coexistence. Out of the woods trudges Samarin, an escapee from Russia’s northernmost prison camp, with a terrifyingly outlandish story to tell about his journey. Immediately apprehended, he is brought before the Czech regiment’s megalomaniac, Captain Matula. But the stranger’s appearance has caught the attention of others, including Anna Petrovna’s. This stranger, his bizarre story—if it is to be believed—and the apparent murder of the local shaman quickly become a flashpoint for this village: temperatures rise, alliances shift, and betrayals emerge. Written with a commanding historical authority and remarkable grace, The People’s Act of Love is an epic of desire and sacrifice that leaves the reader utterly mesmerized through to the final heart-pounding pages.


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The Lost German Slave Girl
The Extraordinary True Story of Sally Miller and Her Fight for Freedom in Old New Orleans
by John Bailey

It is a spring morning in New Orleans, 1843. In the Spanish Quarter, on a street lined with flophouses and gambling dens, Madame Carl recognizes a face from her past. It is the face of a German girl, Sally Miller, who disappeared twenty-five years earlier. But the young woman is property, the slave of a nearby cabaret owner. She has no memory of a "white" past. Yet her resemblance to her mother is striking, and she bears two telltale birthmarks. In brilliant novelistic detail, award-winning historian John Bailey reconstructs the exotic sights, sounds, and smells of mid-nineteenth-century New Orleans, as well as the incredible twists and turns of Sally Miller's celebrated and sensational case. Did Miller, as her relatives sought to prove, arrive from Germany under perilous circumstances as an indentured servant or was she, as her master claimed, part African, and a slave for life? A tour de force of investigative history that reads like a suspense novel, The Lost German Slave Girl is a fascinating exploration of slavery and its laws, a brilliant reconstruction of mid-nineteenth-century New Orleans, and a riveting courtroom drama. It is also an unforgettable portrait of a young woman in pursuit of freedom.


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So Brave, Young, and Handsome
A Novel
by Leif Enger


 In 1915 Minnesota, novelist Monte Becket has lost his sense of purpose. His only success long behind him, Monte lives simply with his wife and son. But when he befriends outlaw Glendon Hale, a new world of opportunity and experience presents itself.  Glendon has spent years in obscurity, but the guilt he harbors for abandoning his wife, Blue, over two decades ago, has lured him from hiding. As the modern age marches swiftly forward, Glendon aims to travel back to his past—heading to California to seek Blue’s forgiveness. Beguiled and inspired, Monte soon finds himself leaving behind his own family to embark for the unruly West with his fugitive guide. As they desperately flee from the relentless Charles Siringo, an ex-Pinkerton who’s been hunting Glendon for years, Monte falls ever further from his family and the law, to be tempered by a fiery adventure from which he may never get home.


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White Ghost Girls
by Alice Greenway

“A sensual, haunting story of sibling love, danger and infatuation with the unknown. . . . This is a brave and artful book, not less powerful for its economy, but perhaps even more so because of it.” —Vendela Vida, New York Times Book Review

Summer 1967. The turmoil of the Maoist revolution is spilling over into Hong Kong and causing unrest as war rages in neighboring Vietnam. White Ghost Girls is the story of Frankie and Kate, two American sisters living in a foreign land in a chaotic time. With their war-photographer father off in Vietnam, Marianne, their beautiful but remote mother, keeps the family close by. Although bound by a closeness of living overseas, the sisters could not be more different—Frankie pulses with curiosity and risk, while Kate is all eyes and ears. Marianne spends her days painting watercolors of the lush surroundings, leaving the girls largely unsupervised, while their Chinese nanny, Ah Bing, does her best to look after them. One day in a village market, they decide to explore—with tragic results. In Alice Greenway’s exquisite gem of a novel, two girls tumble into their teenage years against an extraordinary backdrop both sensuous and dangerous. This astonishing literary debut is a tale of sacrifice and solidarity that gleams with the kind of intense, complicated love that only exists between sisters.


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The Last Crossing
A Novel
by Guy Vanderhaeghe

“[Vanderhaeghe is] a Dickensian sensationalist. His flair for the lurid can be exquisite. . . . Epic novels can be loose, baggy monsters, but this one is stuffed with enough goodies to keep us entertained for days.”—The New York Times Book Review

A #1 bestseller in Canada and winner of the Canadian Booksellers Association’s Fiction Book of the Year Award, The Last Crossing is a sweeping tale of breathtaking quests, adventurous detours, and hard-won redemption. Master-storyteller Guy Vanderhaeghe takes us on an exhilarating journey from the ivy-covered towers of Oxford in Victorian England to the dusty whiskey trading posts of the nineteenth-century American and Canadian West.  Englishmen Charles and Addington Gaunt are ordered by their tyrannical industrialist father to find their brother Simon, who has gone missing in the wilds of the American West. Charles, a disillusioned artist, and Addington, a disgraced military captain, set off to Fort Benton in America and enlist the services of a guide to lead them north, where Simon was last seen. The brothers hire the enigmatic Jerry Potts, half Blackfoot, half Scot, who suffers from his own painful past, and a colorful array of others.  This unlikely posse, now encumbered with both psychological baggage and wagon trains, becomes entangled in an unfolding drama that forces each to come to terms with his or her own demons.  The Last Crossing is an epic masterpiece set in a time when worlds collided, were destroyed, and were built anew.


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Returning to Earth
A Novel
by Jim Harrison


In the universally-praised Returning to Earth, Jim Harrison has delivered a masterpiece—a tender, profound, and magnificent novel about life, death, and the possibility of finding redemption in unlikely places. Donald is a middle-aged Chippewa-Finnish man slowly dying of Lou Gehrig’s disease. His condition deteriorating, he realizes no one will be able to pass on to his children their family history once he is gone. He begins dictating to his wife, Cynthia, stories he has never shared with anyone—as around him, his family struggles to lay him to rest with the same dignity with which he has lived. Over the course of the year following Donald’s death, his daughter begins studying Chippewa ideas of death for clues about her father’s religion, while Cynthia, bereft of the family she created to escape the malevolent influence of her own father, finds that redeeming the past is not a lost cause. Returning to Earth is a deeply moving book about origins and endings, making sense of loss, and living with honor for the dead. It is among the finest novels of Harrison’s long, storied career, and confirms his standing as one of the most important American writers now working.


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The Mammoth Cheese
by Sheri Holman
The Mammoth Cheese delivers a sharp, contemporary story steeped in history that will captivate a new audience while gratifying readers of Holman’s acclaimed earlier work.  Beautifully crafted and driven by warm, vibrant characters, The Mammoth Cheese follows the residents of rural Three Chimneys, Virginia, on their historic journey to re-create the making of the original Thomas Jefferson–era, 1,235-pound "Mammoth Cheese."  Sheri Holman seamlessly weaves together the lives of Three Chimneys, delving into her characters' inescapable family histories as they grapple with religion, divorce, politics, and unrequited love. The Mammoth Cheese is a triumphant exploration of the burdens and joys of rural America and the debts we owe to history, our parents, and ourselves.

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Gould's Book of Fish
A Novel in Twelve Fish
by Richard Flanagan
Flanagan’s novel is an astonishing epic of nineteenth-century Australia, a world of convicts and colonists, thieves and catamites. William Buelow Gould, sentenced to life in a penal colony on Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania), is ordered by the doctor to create an illustrated taxonomy of the country’s exotic sea creatures. Gould’s book was lost and re-created, destroyed and hidden, and finally resurfaced in the present day, littered with scrawls recording Gould’s unutterably strange life—part freewheeling picaresque, part Gothic horror—and that of his country as a penal colony, settlement, and magical frontier populated by generals, visionaries, and madmen. Gould’s Book of Fish is a tour de force that delves into history, science, and artistic creation.

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True North
by Jim Harrison

“Riveting. . . . Harrison’s tragic sense of history and his ironic insight into the depravities of human nature are as potent as ever and bring deeper meaning to his. . . redemptive tale.”—Publishers Weekly

Michigan has been home to Jim Harrison for most of his life, and with his newest and most extraordinary work, he has written the long-awaited novel of his homeland, exposing both its raw beauty and the brutal ravaging it has endured over the last century. An epic tale that pits a son against the legacy of his family’s desecration of the earth, and his own father’s more personal violations, True North is a beautiful and moving novel that speaks to the territory in our hearts that calls us back to our roots. The scion of a family of wealthy timber barons, David Burkett has grown up with a father who is a malevolent force more than a father, and a mother made vague and numb by alcohol and pills. Over thirty years of searching for the truth of what his family has done and trying to make amends, David looks closely at the root of his father’s evil—and threatens, like Icarus, to destroy himself.  In the story of the Burketts, Jim Harrison has given us a family tragedy of betrayal and amends, joy and grief, and justice for the worst of our sins. True North is a bravura performance from one of our finest writers, accomplished with deep humanity, humor, and redemptive soul.


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Indian Killer
by Sherman Alexie
A national best seller, Indian Killer is arguably Sherman Alexie’s most controversial book to date—a gritty, racially charged literary thriller that, over a decade after its first publication, remains an electrifying tale of alienation and justice. A serial murderer called the Indian Killer is terrorizing Seattle, hunting, scalping, and slaughtering white men. Motivated by rage and seeking retribution for his people’s violent history, his grizzly MO and skillful elusiveness both paralyze the city with fear and prompt an uprising of racial brutality.  Out of the chaos emerges John Smith. Born to Indians but raised by white parents, Smith yearns for his lost heritage. As his embitterment with his dual life increases, Smith falls deeper into vengeful madness and quickly surfaces as the prime suspect. Tensions mount, and while Smith battles to allay the anger that engulfs him, the Indian Killer claims another life. With acerbic wit and chilling page-turning intensity, Alexie takes an unflinching look at what nurtures rage within a race both colonized and marginalized by a society that neither values nor understands it.

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Turn of Mind
by Alice LaPlante
A stunning first novel, both literary and thriller, about a retired orthopedic surgeon with dementia, Turn of Mind has already received worldwide attention. With unmatched patience and a pulsating intensity, Alice LaPlante brings us deep into a brilliant woman’s deteriorating mind, where the impossibility of recognizing reality can be both a blessing and a curse.
As the book opens, Dr. Jennifer White’s best friend, Amanda, who lived down the block, has been killed, and four fingers surgically removed from her hand. Dr. White is the prime suspect and she herself doesn’t know whether she did it. Told in White’s own voice, fractured and eloquent, a picture emerges of the surprisingly intimate, complex alliance between these life-long friends—two proud, forceful women who were at times each other’s most formidable adversaries. As the investigation into the murder deepens and White’s relationships with her live-in caretaker and two grown children intensify, a chilling question lingers: is White’s shattered memory preventing her from revealing the truth or helping her to hide it?

A startling portrait of a disintegrating mind clinging to bits of reality through anger, frustration, shame, and unspeakable loss, Turn of Mind is a remarkable debut that examines the deception and frailty of memory and how it defines our very existence.


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Purge
by Sofi Oksanen
Soon to be published in twenty-five languages, Sofi Oksanen’s award-winning novel Purge is a breathtakingly suspenseful tale of two women dogged by their own shameful pasts and the dark, unspoken history that binds them.
     When Aliide Truu, an older woman living alone in the Estonian countryside, finds a disheveled girl huddled in her front yard, she suppresses her misgivings and offers her shelter. Zara is a young sex-trafficking victim on the run from her captors, but a photo she carries with her soon makes it clear that her arrival at Aliide’s home is no coincidence. Survivors both, Aliide and Zara engage in a complex arithmetic of suspicion and revelation to distill each other’s motives; gradually, their stories emerge, the culmination of a tragic family drama of rivalry, lust, and loss that played out during the worst years of Estonia’s Soviet occupation.
     Sofi Oksanen establishes herself as one the most important voices of her generation with this intricately woven tale, whose stakes are almost unbearably high from the first page to the last. Purge is a fiercely compelling and damning novel about the corrosive effects of shame, and of life in a time and place where to survive is to be implicated.


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The Pleasing Hour
by Lily King
Lily King’s highly acclaimed, award-winning debut novel is the story of Rosie, an American au pair in Paris whose coming of age defies all our usual conceptions of naïveté and experience. Rosie is fleeing an unspeakable loss that has left her homesick for her family. As she awkwardly grasps for the words to communicate with and connect to Nicole, the cool, distant, and beautifully polished mother of the three children she cares for, Rosie’s bond with the patriarch of the household develops almost too naturally. When Lola, the middle child, begins to suspect an indecent intimacy between Rosie and her father, Rosie moves to the south of France to care for Nicole’s elderly guardian, the storyteller of the family’s secrets. There, she discovers a past darkened by war and duplicity, and finally comes to understand the tragedy behind Nicole’s elusive demeanor.



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Painted Horses
by Malcolm Brooks
In the mid-1950s, America was flush with prosperity and saw an unbroken line of progress clear to the horizon, while the West was still very much wild. In this ambitious, incandescent debut, Malcolm Brooks animates that time and rugged landscape in a richly textured, sweeping tale of the modern and the ancient, of love and fate, and of heritage threatened by progress.

Catherine Lemay is a young archaeologist on her way to Montana, with a huge task before her—a canyon “as deep as the devil’s own appetites.” Working ahead of a major dam project, she has one summer to prove nothing of historical value will be lost in the flood. From the moment she arrives, nothing is familiar—the vastness of the canyon itself mocks the contained, artifact-rich digs in post-Blitz London where she cut her teeth. And then there’s John H, a former mustanger and veteran of the U.S. Army’s last mounted cavalry campaign, living a fugitive life in the canyon. John H inspires Catherine to see beauty in the stark landscape, and her heart opens to more than the vanished past.

Reminiscent of the work of Wallace Stegner, Thomas McGuane, and Annie Proulx, Painted Horses sends a dauntless young woman on a heroic quest, sings a love song to the horseman’s vanishing way of life, and reminds us that love and ambition, tradition and the future often make strange bedfellows. It establishes Malcolm Brooks as an extraordinary new talent.



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About Face
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

Donna Leon’s eighteen novels have won her countless fans, heaps of critical acclaim, and a place among the top ranks of international crime writers. Through the warm-hearted, perceptive, and principled Commissario Guido Brunetti, Leon’s best-selling books have explored Venice in all its aspects:  history, tourism, high culture, food, family, but also violent crime and political corruption.
In About Face, Leon returns to one of her signature subjects: the environment, which has reached a crisis in Italy. Incinerators across the south of Italy are at full capacity, burning who-knows-what and releasing unacceptable levels of dangerous air pollutants, while in Naples, enormous garbage piles grow in the streets. In Venice, with the polluted waters of the canals and a major chemical complex across the lagoon, the issue is never far from the fore.
Environmental concerns become significant in Brunetti’s work when an investigator from the Carabiniere, looking into the illegal hauling of garbage, asks for a favor. But the investigator is not the only one with a special request. His father-in-law needs help and a mysterious woman comes into the picture. Brunetti soon finds himself in the middle of an investigation into murder and corruption more dangerous than anything he’s seen before.


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Winkie
by Clifford Chase

“The courtroom scenes are wildly, brilliantly comic. . . . But Chase isn't just being cute here. . . . At heart, the book is an argument for openness and inner strength on every imaginable front. Chase makes this out-of-left-field story work brilliantly; a funny and sweet yet seriously topical novel.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

In Cliff Chase’s scathingly funny and surprisingly humane debut novel, the zeitgeist assumes the form of a one-foot-tall ursine Everyman—a mild-mannered teddy bear named Winkie who finds himself on the wrong side of America’s war on terror. After suffering decades of neglect from the children who've forgotten him, Winkie summons the courage to take charge of his fate, and so he hops off the shelf, jumps out the window, and takes to the forest. But just as he is discovering the joys and wonders of mobility, Winkie gets trapped in the jaws of a society gone rabid with fear and paranoia. Having come upon the cabin of the mad professor who stole his beloved, Winkie is suddenly surrounded by the FBI, who instantly conclude that he is the evil mastermind behind dozens of terrorist attacks that have been traced to the forest. Terrified and confused, Winkie is brought to trial, where the prosecution attempts to seal the little bear’s fate by interviewing witnesses from the trials of Galileo, Socrates, John Scopes, and Oscar Wilde. Emotionally gripping and intellectually compelling, Winkie exposes the absurdities of our age and explores what it means to be human in an increasingly barbaric world.


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Lost Nation
by Jeffrey Lent
From the best-selling author Jeffrey Lent, Lost Nation is a tour de force novel impelled by sensuous prose and atmospheric storytelling.  The novel opens with a man known as Blood, guiding an oxcart of rum toward the wild country of New Hampshire, an ungoverned territory called the Indian Stream—a land where the luckless or outlawed have made a fresh start. Blood is a man of contradictions, of learning and wisdom, but also a man with a secret past that has scorched his soul. As the conflicts within the community spill over and attract the attention of outside authorities, Blood becomes a target to those seeking easy blame for their troubles.

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The English Major
A Novel
by Jim Harrison

“It used to be Cliff and Vivian and now it isn’t.” With these words, Jim Harrison begins a riotous, moving novel that sends a sixty-something man, divorced and robbed of his farm by a late-blooming real estate shark of an ex-wife, on a road trip across America.  Cliff is armed with a childhood puzzle of the United States and a mission to rename all the states and state birds, the latter of which have been unjustly saddled with white men’s banal monikers up until now.  His adventures take him through a whirlwind affair with a former student from his high-school-teacher days twenty-some years before, to a “snake farm” in Arizona owned by an old classmate, and to the high-octane existence of his son, a big-time movie producer who has just bought an apartment over the Presidio in San Francisco.  Now in paperback, Jim Harrison’s riotous and moving cross-country novel, The English Major, is the map of a man’s journey into, and out of, himself.  It is vintage Harrison—reflective, big-picture American, and replete with wicked wit.


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Falling in Love
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon’s Death at La Fenice, the first novel in her beloved Commissario Guido Brunetti series, introduced readers to the dazzling world of Venetian opera and Italy’s finest living female soprano, Flavia Petrelli—then a suspect in the poisoning of a renowned German conductor. After Brunetti kept her out of prison and went on to save the life of her female American lover in Acqua Alta, Flavia has once again returned to Venice and La Fenice to perform the lead in Tosca, and Brunetti has tickets to an early show.

The night he and his wife, Paola, attend, Flavia gives a stunning performance to a standing ovation. Back in her dressing room, she finds bouquets of yellow roses—too many roses. Every surface of the room is covered with them. An anonymous fan has been showering Flavia with these beautiful gifts in London, St. Petersburg, Amsterdam, and now, Venice, but she no longer feels flattered. A few nights later, invited by Brunetti to dine at his in-laws’ palazzo, Flavia confesses her alarm at these excessive displays of adoration. Brunetti promises to look into it. And when a talented young Venetian singer who has caught Flavia’s attention is savagely attacked, Brunetti begins to think that Flavia’s fears are justified in ways neither of them imagined. He must enter into the psyche of an obsessive fan before Flavia, or anyone else, comes to harm.


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Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?
by Jeanette Winterson
Jeanette Winterson’s bold and revelatory novels have earned her widespread acclaim, establishing her as a major figure in world literature. She has written some of the most admired books of the past few decades, including her internationally best-selling first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, the story of a young girl adopted by Pentecostal parents, that is now often required reading in contemporary fiction classes.

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? is a memoir about a life’s work to find happiness. It is a book full of stories: about a girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night; about a religious zealot disguised as a mother who has two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the dresser, waiting for Armageddon; about growing up in a north England industrial town now changed beyond recognition; about the universe as a cosmic dustbin. It is the story of how a painful past, which Winterson thought she had written over and repainted, rose to haunt her later in life, sending her on a journey into madness and out again, in search of her biological mother. It is also a book about other people’s literature, one that shows how fiction and poetry can form a string of guiding lights, a life raft that supports us when we are sinking.

Witty, acute, fierce, and celebratory, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? is a tough-minded search for belonging—for love, identity, home, and a mother.



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The Golden Egg
by Donna Leon
Over the years, the best-selling Commissario Guido Brunetti series has conquered the hearts of mystery lovers all over the world. Brunetti is both a perceptive investigator and a principled family man, and through him, Leon has explored Venice in all its aspects: its history, beauty, food, and social life, but also its crime and corruption.

In The Golden Egg, as the first leaves of autumn begin to fall, Vice Questore Patta asks Brunetti to look into a minor violation committed by the mayor’s future daughter-in-law. Brunetti has no interest in helping his boss amass political favors, but he has little choice but to comply. Then Brunetti’s wife, Paola, comes to him with a request of her own. The mentally handicapped man who worked at their dry cleaners has just died of a sleeping pill overdose, and Paola loathes the idea that he lived and died without anyone noticing him, or helping him.

To please his wife, Brunetti investigates the death, and is surprised to find nothing on the man: no birth certificate, no passport, no driver’s license, no credit cards. As far as the Italian government is concerned, he never existed. And yet, there is the body. As secrets unravel, Brunetti suspects an aristocratic family might be somehow connected to the death. But why would anyone want this sweet, simple-minded man dead?


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The Threepenny Opera
by Bertolt Brecht

The Threepenny Opera broke box-office records in its original Berlin run, 1928-1933, and has had many extremely successful runs in the United States ever since.
There have been several English adaptations. The present "book" of Desmond Vesey's renders every word of the German, including Bertolt Brecht's Notes. Eric Bentley's lyrics are also faithful to the German, though they are, of course, written to be sung to the famous Kurt Weill's music.
Kurt Weill's widow, the great actress and chanteuse Lotte Lenya, has written the introduction, telling the story of how The Threepenny Opera came into being.


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Drawing Conclusions
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Nearly twenty years ago, when a conductor was poisoned and the Questura sent a man to investigate, readers first met Commissario Guido Brunetti. Since 1992’s Death at La Fenice, Donna Leon and her shrewd, sophisticated, and compassionate investigator have been delighting readers around the world. For her millions of fans, Leon’s novels have opened a window into the private Venice of her citizens, a world of incomparable beauty, family intimacy, shocking crime, and insidious corruption. This internationally acclaimed, bestselling series is widely considered one of the best ever written, and Atlantic Monthly Press is thrilled to be publishing the twentieth installment, Drawing Conclusions, this spring.

Late one night, Brunetti is called away from dinner to investigate the death of a widow in her modest apartment. Though there are some signs of a struggle, the medical examiner rules that she died of a heart attack. It seems there is nothing for Brunetti to investigate. But he can’t shake the feeling that something or someone may have triggered her heart attack, that perhaps the woman was threatened. Conversations with the woman’s son, her upstairs neighbor, and the nun in charge of the old-age home where she volunteered, do little to satisfy Brunetti’s nagging curiosity. With the help of Inspector Vianello and the ever-resourceful Signorina Elettra, perhaps Brunetti can get to the truth and find some measure of justice.

Insightful and emotionally powerful, Drawing Conclusions reaffirms Donna Leon’s status as one of the masters of literary crime fiction.


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Sing Them Home
by Stephanie Kallos

Sing Them Home is a moving portrait of three siblings who have lived in the shadow of unresolved grief since their mother’s disappearance when they were children. Everyone in Emlyn Springs knows the story of Hope Jones, the physician’s wife whose big dreams for their tiny town were lost along with her in the tornado of 1978. For Hope’s three young children, the stability of life with their preoccupied father, and with Viney, their mother’s spitfire best friend, is no match for Hope’s absence. Larken, the eldest, is now an art history professor who seeks in food an answer to a less tangible hunger; Gaelan, the son, is a telegenic weatherman who devotes his life to predicting the unpredictable; and the youngest, Bonnie, is a self-proclaimed archivist who combs roadsides for clues to her mother’s legacy, and permission to move on. When they’re summoned home after their father’s death, each sibling is forced to revisit the childhood tragedy that has defined their lives. With breathtaking lyricism, wisdom, and humor, Kallos explores the consequences of protecting those we love. Sing Them Home is a magnificent tapestry of lives connected and undone by tragedy, lives poised—unbeknownst to the characters—for redemption.


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Through a Glass, Darkly
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

On a luminous spring day in Venice, Commissario Guido Brunetti and Inspector Vianello play hooky to help get Vianello’s friend Marco Ribetti—an environmental activist arrested during a protest against toxic waste being dumped into the city’s waters—released from prison. But on the steps of the police headquarters, they come face-to-face with Ribetti’s cantankerous father-in-law, who has been overheard making threats against Ribetti. And when the body of a night watchman is at the father-in-law’s glass factory next to an annotated copy of Dante’s Inferno, Brunetti must find out if there is a connection between this and whoever is ruining the waters of the lagoon.



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Truth and Bright Water
by Thomas King

Thomas King is a writer of lyrical, comic poignancy, and a best-seller in Canada. Truth & Bright Water tells of a summer in the life of Tecumseh and Lum, young Native cousins coming of age in the Montana town of Truth, and the Bright Water Reserve across the river in Alberta. It opens with a mysterious woman with a suitcase, throwing things into the river—then jumping in herself. Tecumseh and Lum go to help, but she and her truck have disappeared. Other mysteries puzzle Tecumseh: if his mom will take his dad back; if his rolling-stone aunt is home to stay; why no one protects Lum from his father's rages. Then Tecumseh gets a job helping an artist—Bright Water's most famous son—with the project of a lifetime. As Truth and Bright Water prepare for the Indian Days festival, their secrets come together in a climax of tragedy, reconciliation, and love.


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The Jewels of Paradise
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon has won heaps of critical praise and legions of fans for her best-selling mystery series featuring Commissario Guido Brunetti, one of contemporary crime fiction’s most beloved characters. Over twenty-one books this sharp, kind-hearted native Venetian has exposed read­ers to contemporary Venice in all its aspects: its arts and architecture, food and family life, but also its crime and insidious corruption. With The Jewels of Paradise, Leon takes readers beyond the world of the Venetian Questura in her first stand-alone novel.

Caterina Pellegrini is a native Venetian, and like so many of them, she’s had to leave home to pursue her career elsewhere, mostly abroad. With a doctorate in baroque opera from Vienna, she lands in Birmingham, England, as a research fellow and assistant professor. Birmingham, however, is no Venice, so when she gets word of a position back home, Caterina jumps at the opportunity.

The job is an unusual one. After nearly three centuries, two locked trunks, believed to contain the papers of a once-famous, now largely forgotten baroque composer, have been discovered. The composer was deeply connected in religious and political circles, but he died childless, and now two Venetian men, descendants of his cousins, each claim inheritance. With rumors of a treasure, they aren’t about to share the possible fortune. Caterina has been hired to attend the opening of the trunks and examine any enclosed papers to discover the “testamentary disposition” of the composer. But when her research takes her in unexpected directions and a silent man follows her through the streets, she begins to wonder just what secrets these trunks may hold. From a masterful writer, The Jewels of Paradise is a superb novel, a grip­ping tale of intrigue, music, history, and greed.



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The Divine Husband
A Novel
by Francisco Goldman
With his previous novels, Francisco Goldman has reaped immense acclaim and established himself as an American voice of vital importance. His third novel is a marvelous tale of great love, the soul of the Americas and the birth of the modern spirit, set in the convents, ballrooms, and coffee plantations of late-nineteenth-century Central America and the docks, rooming houses, and stately Fifth Avenue addresses of New York. When we meet María de las Nieves Moran, she is a bookish and dreamy novice nun—until the country’s new ruler closes the convents. What will be her fate in the secular world? When María de las Nieves enrolls in a writing class under José Martí, her life is transformed by the brilliant poet and hero of Cuban independence, whose year in that Central American capital results in Latin America’s most famous love poem. María de las Nieves’s story unfolds among an unforgettable cast of characters striving for love or success: Paquita, her lifelong best friend and nemesis; Mack Chinchilla, the Yankee-Indio entrepreneur intent on winning her hand; a stuffy British diplomat who courts her; and a character known only as “the Mysterious Muchacho.” And when María de las Nieves departs for New York years later, young daughter in tow, she continues to evade the mystery of who, of her many suitors, is the girl’s father, and what really happened between her and José Martí.

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Minaret
by Leila Aboulela

Leila Aboulela's American debut is a provocative, timely, and engaging novel about a young Muslim woman—once privileged and secular in her native land and now impoverished in London—gradually embracing her orthodox faith. With her Muslim hijab and down-turned gaze, Najwa is invisible to most eyes, especially to the rich families whose houses she cleans in London. Twenty years ago, Najwa, then at university in Khartoum, would never have imagined that one day she would be a maid. An upper-class Westernized Sudanese, her dreams were to marry well and raise a family. But a coup forces the young woman and her family into political exile in London. Soon orphaned, she finds solace and companionship within the Muslim community. Then Najwa meets Tamer, the intense, lonely younger brother of her employer. They find a common bond in faith and slowly, silently, begin to fall in love. Written with directness and force, Minaret is a lyric and insightful novel about Islam and an alluring glimpse into a culture Westerners are only just beginning to understand.


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How I Became a Famous Novelist
by Steve Hely

In this blistering evisceration of celebrity culture and literary fame, a roguish loser sets out to write the best-sellingest best seller of all time. When he actually pulls it off, he winds up tearing like a tornado across America’s cultural landscape.
This is the story of how he succeeds in getting it all, and what it costs him in the end.
Narrated by an unlikely literary legend, How I Became a Famous Novelist pinballs from the postcollege slums of Boston to the fear-drenched halls of Manhattan’s publishing houses, from the gloomy purity of Montana’s foremost writing workshop to the hedonistic hotel bars of the Sunset Strip.
This is the horrifying, hilarious tale of how Pete Tarslaw’s “pile of garbage,” called The Tornado Ashes Club, became the most talked about, blogged about, read, admired, and reviled novel in America. It will change everything you think you know—about literature, appearance, truth, beauty, and those people out there, somewhere in America, who still care about books.



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The Perfect Summer
England 1911, Just Before the Storm
by Juliet Nicolson

The Perfect Summer chronicles a glorious English summer a century ago, when the world was on the cusp of irrevocable change. Through the tight lens of four months, Juliet Nicolson’s rich storytelling gifts rivet us with the sights, colors, and feelings of a bygone era. That summer of 1911 a new king was crowned and the aristocracy was at play, bounding from one house party to the next. But perfection was not for all. Cracks in the social fabric were showing. The country was brought to a standstill by industrial strikes. Temperatures rose steadily to more than 100 degrees; by August deaths from heatstroke were too many for newspapers to report. Drawing on material from intimate and rarely seen sources and narrated through the eyes of a series of exceptional individuals—among them a debutante, a choirboy, a politician, a trade unionist, a butler, and the queen—The Perfect Summer is a vividly rendered glimpse of the twilight of the Edwardian era.


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Annabel
A Novel
by Kathleen Winter
Kathleen Winter’s luminous debut novel is a deeply affecting portrait of life in an enchanting seaside town and the trials of growing up unique in a restrictive environment. In 1968, into the devastating, spare atmosphere of Labrador, Canada, a child is born: a baby who appears to be neither fully boy nor girl, but both at once. Only three people are privy to the secret—the baby’s parents, Jacinta and Treadway, and their trusted neighbor, Thomasina. Though Treadway makes the decision to raise the child as a boy named Wayne, the women continue to quietly nurture the boy’s female side. And as Wayne grows into adulthood within the hypermasculine hunting society of his father, his shadow-self, a girl he calls “Annabel,” is never entirely extinguished. When Wayne escapes the confines of his hometown and settles in St. John’s, the anonymity of the city grants him the freedom to confront his dualism. His ultimate choice will call into question the integrity and allegiance of those he loves most. A literary gem about the urge to unveil mysterious truth in a culture that shuns contradiction, and the body’s insistence on coming home, Annabel is a daringly unusual debut full of unforgettable beauty.



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Rain
by Kirsty Gunn

Twelve-year-old Janey and her younger brother, Jim spend summers at a lake with their parents. Ignored for long stretches and then called upon suddenly to mix drinks or receive drunken kisses, the children huddle together in tender, compulsive closeness. Nourished only by their devotion to one another, the two fill their neglected hours exploring the lush, dangerous landscape and protecting each other from the unpredictable moods of the dark adult world that surrounds them. A haunting, beautifully rendered story that explores the hidden dangers of childhood, Rain establishes Kirsty Gunn as one of the most promising and original writers of her generation.


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Fault Lines
by Nancy Huston

A best seller in France, with over 400,000 copies sold, and currently being translated into eighteen languages, Fault Lines is the new novel from internationally-acclaimed and best-selling author Nancy Huston. Huston's novel is a profound and poetic story that traces four generations of a single family from present-day California to WW II¨Cera Germany. Fault Lines begins with Sol, a gifted, terrifying child whose mother believes he is destined for greatness partly because he has a birthmark like his dad, his grandmother, and his great-grandmother. When Sol's family makes an unexpected trip to Germany, secrets begin to emerge about their history during World War II. It seems birthmarks are not all that's been passed down through the bloodlines. Closely observed, lyrically told, and epic in scope, Fault Lines is a touching, fearless, and unusual novel about four generations of children and their parents. The story moves from the West Coast of the United States to the East, from Haifa to Toronto to Munich, as secrets unwind back through time until a devastating truth about the family's origins is reached. Huston tells a riveting, vigorous tale in which love, music, and faith rage against the shape of evil.


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Sick Girl
by Amy Silverstein

The hardcover publication of Sick Girl garnered tremendous attention, generated impressive sales, and ignited controversy. Both inspiring and provocative, reactions to the book ranged from inflammatory posts on a U.S. News & World Report blog, to hundreds of letters from readers, to a full-page review in People. Amy’s force, candor, and her refusal to be the thankful patient from whom we expect undiluted gratitude for the medical treatments that have extended her life, have put her at the center of a debate on patient rights and the omnipotent power of doctors.  At twenty-four, Amy was a typical type-A law student: smart, driven, and highly competitive. With a full course load and a budding romance, it seemed nothing could slow her down. Until her heart began to fail. Amy chronicles her harrowing medical journey from the first misdiagnosis to her astonishing recovery, which is made all the more dramatic by the romantic bedside courtship with her future husband, and her uncompromising desire to become a mother.  In her remarkable book she presents a patient’s perspective with shocking honesty that allows the reader to live her nightmare from the inside—an unforgettable experience that is both disturbing and utterly compelling.


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The Long Night of White Chickens
by Francisco Goldman

Winner of the 1992 Sue Kaufman Prize for first fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a PEN/Faulkner award finalist, this is the story of Roger Graetz, raised in a Boston suburb by an aristocratic Guatemalan mother, and his relationship with Flor de Mayo, a beautiful young Guatemalan orphan sent by his grandmother to live with his family as a maid.



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Father of the Rain
A Novel
by Lily King
In her most ambitious novel to date, Lily King sets her sharply insightful family drama in an upper-middle-class suburb where she traces a complex and explosive father-daughter relationship from the 1970s to the present day.
        When eleven-year-old Daley’s parents separate, she is thrust into a chaotic adult world of competition, indulgence, and manipulation. Unable to place her allegiance, she gently toes the thickening line between her parents’ worlds: the liberal, socially committed realm of her mother, and the conservative, liquor-soaked life of her father. But without her mother there to keep him in line, Daley’s father’s basest impulses are unleashed, and Daley has to choose her own survival over the father she still loves.
As she grows into adulthood, Daley retreats from the New England country-club culture that nourished her father’s fears and addictions, attempting to live outside his influence. Until he hits rock bottom. Faced with the chance to free her father from sixty years of dependency, Daley must decide whether repairing their broken relationship is worth losing not only her professional dreams, but the love of her life, Jonathan, who represents so much of what Daley’s father claims to hate, and who has given her so much of what he could never provide


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In Cuba I Was a German Shepherd
by Ana Menéndez
Cuban-American Pushcart Prize winner Ana Menéndez offers a hypnotic debut collection of linked tales about the attempts of immigrants to make new lives in America. A lush, generous storyteller, Menéndez effortlessly summons up novelistic themes in her short stories: the hopes and disappointments of postrevolutionary Castro Cuba, Havana in all its beauty and sadness, and the cultural ties that bind family. With the subtle pacing of Lorrie Moore and the rich descriptiveness of Laura Esquivel, Ana Menéndez explores whether any of us is capable, or even truly desirous, of outrunning our origins.

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Sightseeing
by Rattawut Lapcharoensap
One of the most widely reviewed debuts of the year, Sightseeing is a masterful story collection by an award-winning young author. Set in contemporary Thailand, these are generous, radiant tales of family bonds, youthful romance, generational conflicts and cultural shiftings beneath the glossy surface of a warm, Edenic setting. Written with exceptional acuity, grace and sophistication, the stories present a nation far removed from its exoticized stereotypes. In the prize-winning opening story "Farangs," the son of a beachside motel owner commits the cardinal sin of falling for a pretty American tourist. In the novella, "Cockfighter," a young girl witnesses her proud father's valiant but foolhardy battle against a local delinquent whose family has a vicious stranglehold on the villagers. Through his vivid assemblage of parents and children, natives and transients, ardent lovers and sworn enemies, Lapcharoensap dares us to look with new eyes at the circumstances that shape our views and the prejudices that form our blind spots. Gorgeous and lush, painful and candid, Sightseeing is an extraordinary reading experience, one that powerfully reveals that when it comes to how we respond to pain, anger, hurt, and love, no place is too far from home.

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Up High in the Trees
A Novel
by Kiara Brinkman

This is an exquisite debut novel about a family in turmoil, told in the startling, deeply affecting voice of a nine-year-old, autistic boy. Following the sudden death of Sebby’s mother, his father takes Sebby to live in the family’s summerhouse, hoping it will give them both time and space to recover. But Sebby’s father deteriorates in this new isolation, leaving Sebby struggling to understand his mother’s death alone, dreaming and even reliving moments of her life. He ultimately reaches out to a favorite teacher back home and to two nearby children who force him out of the void of the past and help him to exist in the present. In spare and gorgeous prose buoyed by the life force of its small, fearless narrator, Up High in the Trees introduces an astonishingly fresh and powerful literary voice.


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Pigeons
The Fascinating Saga of the World's Most Revered and Reviled Bird
by Andrew D. Blechman

Pigeons have been worshipped as fertility goddesses and revered as symbols of peace. Domesticated since the dawn of man, they’ve been used as crucial communicators in war by every major historical superpower from ancient Egypt to the United States and are credited with saving thousands of lives. Charles Darwin relied heavily on pigeons to help formulate and support his theory of evolution. Yet today they are reviled as “rats with wings.” Author Andrew D. Blechman traveled across the United States and Europe to meet with pigeon fanciers and pigeon haters in a quest to find out how we came to misunderstand one of mankind’s most helpful and steadfast companions. Pigeons captures a Brooklyn man’s quest to win the Main Event (the pigeon world’s equivalent of the Kentucky Derby), as well as a convention dedicated to breeding the perfect bird. Blechman participates in a live pigeon shoot where entrants pay $150; he tracks down Mike Tyson, the nation’s most famous pigeon lover; he spends time with Queen Elizabeth’s Royal Pigeon Handler; and he sheds light on a radical “pro-pigeon underground’ in New York City. In Pigeons, Blechman tells for the first time the remarkable story behind this seemingly unremarkable bird.


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The Disappeared
by Kim Echlin
A fiercely beautiful love story for the ages, The Disappeared traces one woman’s three-decades-long journey from the peaceful streets of Montreal to the war-torn villages of Cambodia, as a brief affair turns into a grand passion of loss and remembrance, set against one of the most brutal genocides of our time. When sixteen-year-old Anne Greves first meets Serey, a Cambodian student forced to leave his country during the rise of the Khmer Rouge, she never considers the consequences of their complicated romance. Swept up in the infatuation of young love, Anne ignores her father’s wishes and embraces her relationship with Serey in Montreal’s smoky jazz clubs and in his cramped yellow bedroom. But when the borders of Cambodia are reopened, Serey must risk his life to return home in search of his family. A decade later, Anne will travel halfway around the world to find him, and to save their love from the same tragic forces that first brought them together. In aching, tender prose, Kim Echlin challenges our notions of how to both claim the past of move on after insufferable loss. Part elegy, part love letter, part call to arms, The Disappeared is a soaring tribute to those who have disappeared in the violent conflicts throughout history.

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By the Shore
by Galaxy Craze
As direct and precise as a child's diary, By the Shore introduces the world of twelve-year-old May, who lives in a less-than-thriving oceanfront bed-and-breakfast run by her single mother. May's life is filled with the frustrations and promise of youth, complicated by a loving if distracted young mother who strives to care for her two children without forfeiting her own fun and passion.  British-born and-raised Galaxy Craze writes with delicate confidence of the subtle-ties of childhood understanding and the tender workings of new relationships. By the Shore is a crystalline capturing of a modern romance and that fragile, bittersweet world of youth on the cusp of adulthood.

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A Circle of Wives
by Alice LaPlante

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A Question of Belief
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon’s best-selling series featuring the principled, warmhearted Venetian Commissario Guido Brunetti has won her countless fans, critical acclaim, and international renown as one of the world’s best crime writers. In A Question of Belief, Brunetti must contend with ingenious corruption, bureaucratic intransigence, and the stifling heat of a Venetian summer. With his hometown beset by hordes of tourists and baking under a glaring sun, Brunetti’s greatest wish is to go to the mountains with his family, where he can sleep under a down comforter and catch up on his reading. But before he can go on vacation, a folder with court records has landed on his desk, brought by an old friend. It appears that cases at the local court—hardly known as a model of efficiency—are being delayed to the benefit of one of the parties. A creative new trick for corrupting the system, perhaps, but what can Brunetti do about it? And just when it looks like Brunetti will be able to get away, a shocking, violent crime forces him to stay in Venice. This is a stellar addition to Leon’s celebrated series: atmospheric, packed with excellent characters, and building to an explosive, indelible ending.

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The English Teacher
by Lily King
Named one of the Ten Best Novels of 2005 by Publishers Weekly, Lily King’s new novel is a story about an independent woman and her fifteen-year-old son, who is on a circuitous path toward a truth his mother has long concealed from him. Fifteen years ago Vida Avery arrived alone and pregnant at elite Fayer Academy. She has since become a fixture and one of the best teachers Fayer has ever had. By living on campus, on an island off the New England coast, Vida has cocooned herself and her son, Peter, from the outside world and from an inside secret. For years she has lived largely through the books she teaches, but when she accepts the impulsive marriage proposal of ardent widower Tom Belou, the prescribed life Vida has constructed is swiftly dismantled. This is a passionate tale of a mother and son’s vital bond and a provocative look at our notions of intimacy, honesty, loyalty, and the real meaning of home. A triumphant and masterful follow-up to her multi-award-winning debut, The English Teacher confirms Lily King as one of the most accomplished and vibrant young voices of today.

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Loving Che
A Novel
by Ana Menéndez
Ana Menéndez’s story collection In Cuba I Was a German Shepherd was selected as a New York Times Notable Book of the Year.  Now, in her first novel, Loving Che, Menéndez delivers an astonishing, intimate portrait of revolutionary Cuba as witnessed by an elderly woman recalling her secret love affair with Ernesto “Che” Guevara. The story opens in contemporary Miami, where for years a young Cuban woman has been searching in vain for details of her birth mother. All she knows of her past is that her grandfather fled the turbulent Havana of the 1960s for Miami with her in tow, and pinned to her sweater were a few treasured lines of a Pablo Neruda poem. These facts remain her only tenuous links to her history, until a mysterious parcel arrives in the mail. Inside the soft, worn box are layers of writings and photographs. Fitting these pieces together, the daughter reconstructs the life of her mother, her youthful affair with the enigmatic Che, and the child she bore by the handsome rebel. Loving Che is a brilliant recapturing of revolutionary Cuba, the changing social mores, the hopes and disappointments, the excitement and terror of the times.

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Dancing Arabs
by Sayed Kashua
The debut novel by twenty-eight-year-old Arab-Israeli Sayed Kashua has been praised around the world for its honesty, irony, humor, and its uniquely human portrayal of a young man who moves between two societies, becoming a stranger to both. Kashua’s nameless antihero has big shoes to fill, having grown up with the myth of a grandfather who died fighting the Zionists in 1948, and with a father who was jailed for blowing up a school cafeteria in the name of freedom. When he is granted a scholarship to an elite Jewish boarding school, his family rejoices, dreaming that he will grow up to be the first Arab to build an atom bomb. But to their dismay, he turns out to be a coward devoid of any national pride; his only ambition is to fit in with his Jewish peers who reject him. He changes his clothes, his accent, his eating habits, and becomes an expert at faking identities, sliding between different cultures, schools and languages, and eventually a Jewish lover and an Arab wife. With refreshing candor and self-deprecating wit, Dancing Arabs brilliantly maps one man’s struggle to disentangle his personal and national identities, only to tragically and inevitably forfeit both.

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Halfway House
A Novel
by Katharine Noel

One day, Angie Voorster—diligent student, all-star swimmer, and Ivy League–bound high school senior—dives to the bottom of a pool and stays there. In that moment, everything the Voorster family believes they know about one another changes. Set in a small town in New Hampshire, Halfway House is the story of Angie’s psychotic break and her family’s subsequent turmoil. Each of her family members responds differently to the ongoing crisis: Her father Pieter, a professional cellist, retreats further into his music; her mother begins a destabilizing affair with a younger man; her younger brother, Luke, first pushes away from her then later drops out of college to be closer to her. Though the Voorsters manage for a time to maintain a semblance of the normalcy they had “before," it is not until Angie is finally able to fend for herself that the family is able to truly fall apart and then regather itself in a new, fundamentally changed way. With grace and precision rarely seen in a first novel, Noel guides readers through a world where love is imperfect, and where longing for an imagined ideal can both destroy one family’s happiness and offer redemption.


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Suffer the Little Children
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon


Donna Leon
’s evocative and addictive Commissario Guido Brunetti series continues with Suffer the Little Children. When Brunetti is summoned to the hospital bed of a respected pediatrician, he is confronted with more questions than answers. Three men have burst into the doctor’s apartment at night, attacked him and taken away his infant son. What could have motivated an assault so violent it has left the doctor mute? Who would dare to take the child? At the same time, Brunetti’s colleague, Inspector Vianello, discovers a money-making scam between pharmacists and doctors. But it appears as if one of the pharmacists is after more than money.


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Turpentine
by Spring Warren

A comic glance at the old American West and a serious story about transformation and redemption, Turpentine is a bold, inventive novel about a young man’s attempt to make sense of the past while unsteadily growing into adulthood. In 1871, Edward Turrentine Bayard III, sick and restless, leaves his Connecticut home to recover out west. But when the private sanitarium in which he is to stay proves to be nothing more than a rickety outpost on the Nebraskan plains, he becomes a buffalo skinner. After returning to the East, Ned teams up with Phaegin, who earns her money rolling cigars, and Curly, a fourteen-year-old coal miner, but the newfound trio is wrongly accused of triggering a bomb at a labor rally, and they must flee. With a Pinkerton agent following their every move, the gang of winsome ne’er-do-wells takes flight on a circuitous escape through northern outposts into Indian country, past the slums of Chicago, and into the boundless Great Plains. En route they become witness to the transformation and growing pains of a burgeoning nation. A picaresque novel of wonderful energy and unforgettable characters, Turpentine is a comic, prescient look at the growth of an individual and a country.


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The Girl of His Dreams
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

Donna Leon’s Commissario Guido Brunetti mysteries have won legions of fans for their evocative portraits of Venetian life. In her novels, food, family, art, history, and local politics play as central a role as an unsolved crime. In The Girl of His Dreams when a friend of Brunetti’s brother, a priest recently returned from years of missionary work, calls with a request, Brunetti suspects the man’s motives. A new, American-style Protestant sect has begun to meet in the city, and it’s possible the priest is merely apprehensive of the competition. But the preacher could also be fleecing his growing flock, so Brunetti and Paola, along with Inspector Vianello and his wife, go undercover.

But the investigation has to be put aside when, one cold and rainy morning, a body is found floating in a canal. It is a child, a gypsy girl. Brunetti suspects she fell off a nearby roof while fleeing an apartment she had robbed. He has to inform the distrustful parents, encamped on the mainland, and soon finds himself haunted by the crime—and the girl. Thought-provoking, eye-opening, and profoundly moving, The Girl of His Dreams is classic Donna Leon, a spectacular, heart-wrenching addition to the series.


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The Siege
by Helen Dunmore

Set during the 1941 siege on Leningrad, Dunmore's evocative novel of love and desperation follows the Levin family—twenty-two-year-old Anna; her young brother, Kolya; and their father, Mikhail—as their world is thrown into unimagined turmoil. All of Leningrad is trapped by the besieging German army, but daily life must go on. While Kolya plays with his toy fort, his tiny body grows cruelly thin. While Anna dreams of an artist's life, she forages for food in the ever more desperate city. Before the siege is over, a mysterious ex-actress (Mikhail's onetime lover) and a gentle young doctor (Anna's true love, perhaps) come to the Levins' frozen little apartment. The Siege is a profoundly moving celebration of love, life, and survival.


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The Cry of the Dove
A Novel
by Fadia Faqir
Timely and lyrical, The Cry of the Dove is the story of one young woman and an evocative portrait of forbidden love and violated honor in a culture whose reverberations are felt profoundly in our world today. Salma has committed a crime punishable by death in her Bedouin tribe of Hima, Levant: she had sex out of wedlock and became pregnant. Despite the insult it would commit against her people, Salma has the child and suddenly finds herself a fugitive on the run from those seeking to restore their honor. Salma is rushed into protective custody where her newborn is ripped from her arms, and where she sits alone for years before being ushered to safety in England. Away from her Bedouin village, Salma is an asylum-seeker trying to melt into the crowd, under pressure to reassess her way of life. She learns English customs from her landlady and befriends a Pakistani girl who is also on the run, with whose help Salma finally forges a new identity. But just as things settle, the need to return for her lost daughter overwhelms her, and one fateful day, Salma risks everything to go back and find her.

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Wash
by Margaret Wrinkle
In this luminous debut, Margaret Wrinkle takes us on an unforgettable journey across continents and through time, from the burgeoning American South to West Africa and deep into the ancestral stories that reside in the soul.  Wash introduces a remarkable new voice in American literature.

In early 1800s Tennessee, two men find themselves locked in an intimate power struggle.  Richardson, a troubled Revolutionary War veteran, has spent his life fighting not only for his country but also for wealth and status.  When the pressures of westward expansion and debt threaten to destroy everything he’s built, he sets Washington, a young man he owns, to work as his breeding sire.  Wash, the first member of his family to be born into slavery, struggles to hold onto his only solace: the spirituality inherited from his shamanic mother.  As he navigates the treacherous currents of his position, despair and disease lead him to a potent healer named Pallas.  Their tender love unfolds against this turbulent backdrop while she inspires him to forge a new understanding of his heritage and his place in it.  Once Richardson and Wash find themselves at a crossroads, all three lives are pushed to the brink.


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Deafening
by Frances Itani

“A gorgeously moving, old-fashioned novel.”—O, The Oprah Magazine

Frances Itani’s lauded and award-winning American debut novel has been sold in sixteen countries, was a Canadian best seller for sixteen weeks, reaching #1, and has been awarded the Commonwealth Writers Prize Best Book Award for the Caribbean and Canadian Region. Set on the eve of the Great War, Deafening is a tale of remarkable virtuosity and power.  At the age of five, Grania emerges from a bout of scarlet fever profoundly deaf, and is suddenly sealed off from the world that was just beginning to open for her. Sent to the Ontario School for the Deaf, Grania must learn to live away from her family. When Grania falls in love with Jim Lloyd, a young hearing man, her life seems complete, but WWI soon tears them apart when Jim is sent to the battlefields of Flanders. During this long and brutal war of attrition, Jim and Grania’s letters back and forth-both real and imagined-attempt to sustain the intimacy they discovered in Canada.  A magnificent tale of love and war, Deafening is also an ode to language-how it can console, imprison, and liberate, and how it alone can bridge vast chasms of geography and experience.


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Gilgamesh
by Joan London
Winner of The Age Book of the Year Award for Fiction, Gilgamesh is “riveting in its strangeness and immediacy, evoking with stark power a world almost inconceivably isolated and remote.”—Publishers Weekly. The year is 1937 and seventeen-year-old Edith lives a sheltered life with her family. With tales of exotic lands and cultures, her cousin Leopold and his friend Aram captivate Edith with the story of Gilgamesh, the legendary king of Uruk in ancient Mesopotamia, and his search for the secret of eternal life. Two years later, Edith and her young son, set off on a journey of their own, to Soviet Armenia, where they are trapped by the outbreak of war. Beautifully marrying the intimate scope of a life with the enormity of war, London's tale examines what happens when we strike out into the world, and how, we eventually find our way home.

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Frankie's Place
A Love Story
by Jim Sterba

Every year after a long Manhattan winter, Frances FitzGerald, author of the Pulitizer Prize winner Fire in the Lake, heads for Mount Desert Island on the Maine coast to spend the summer writing.  Jim Sterba, an acquaintance and veteran correspondent, comes one summer for a weekend visit, then for another weekend that fall. The next summer he stays for week, and gradually he falls for his host as much as her place!  These two couldn't have had more disparate childhoods, but their intelligence, ambition, and independence propelled them both in writing careers and kept them single until they met each other later in life. This long path to real love makes us cheer Jim as he walks up a mountain to propose to Frankie, and has us itching for a visit to Mount Desert Island.


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Blood from a Stone
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Blood from a Stone brings Donna Leon’s celebrated character Commissario Guido Brunetti back on the scene: On a cold Venetian night shortly before Christmas, a street vendor is killed in a scuffle in Campo San Stefano. The closest witnesses to the event are the tourists who had been browsing the man’s wares before his death—fake handbags of every designer label. The dead man is one of the many African immigrants purveying goods outside normal shop hours and trading without a work permit. Like everybody involved, Commissario Brunetti wonders why anyone would kill an illegal immigrant. But once Brunetti begins to investigate this unfamiliar Venetian underworld, he discovers that matters of great value are at stake within the secretive society. Warned by Patta, his superior, to resist further involvement in the case, Brunetti only becomes more determined to unearth the truth behind this mysterious killing. Reluctant as he is to let this event be smugly relegated to the category of “not worth dealing with,” how far will Brunetti be able to penetrate the murky subculture in this illegal community? Blood from a Stone is an exquisite and irresistible mystery offering an unexpected take on life in contemporary Venice.

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Remember Me
A Novel
by Trezza Azzopardi

The much-anticipated second novel by the Man Booker Prize finalist and national best-selling author of The Hiding Place is a harrowing, elegant, and vivid portrait of a lost life reclaimed. When Winnie’s closed existence is shattered by a random act of violence, she embarks on a journey to track down her stolen belongings—and soon finds her search has become the rediscovery of a stolen life. As Winnie pieces together the fragments of her once-secluded world, it begins to fill with people: her devoted father; the haunting figure of her mother; her domineering grandfather; and Joseph, her only love. Now she must come to terms with a final revelation so profoundly shocking that she had concealed it even from herself.


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Baal, A Man's a Man
by Bertolt Brecht

The story of a charming, ruthlessly amoral young poet, Baal (1918) is Brecht's first play and "a passionate acceptance of the world in all its sordid grandeur" (Martin Esslin). A Man's A Man (1926), Brecht's first excursion into "epic theater," traces the terrifying transformation of the sweet, good Galy Gay into a bloodthirsty "human fighting machine." Galy reappears in the brief, sardonic Elephant Calf, a sort of coda. Powerful stage works in their own right, these three early plays also provide crucial insights into Brecht's dramatic techniques and preoccupations before the decisive embrace of Marxism in 1928.


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By its Cover
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon’s critically acclaimed, internationally bestselling Commissario Guido Brunetti series has attracted readers the world over with the beauty of its setting, the humanity of its characters, and its fearlessness in exploring politics, morality, and contemporary Italian culture. In the pages of Leon’s novels, the beloved conversations of the Brunetti family have frequently drawn on topics of art and literature, but books are at the heart of this twenty-third installment in a way they never have been before.

One afternoon, Commissario Guido Brunetti gets a frantic call from the director of a prestigious Venetian library. Someone has stolen pages out of several rare books. After a round of questioning, the case seems clear: the culprit must be the man who requested the volumes, an American professor from a Kansas university. The only problem—the man fled the library earlier that day, and after checking his credentials, the American professor doesn’t exist.

As the investigation proceeds, the suspects multiply. And when a seemingly harmless theologian, who had spent three years at the library reading the Fathers of the Church, turns up brutally murdered, Brunetti must question his expectations about what makes a man innocent, or guilty.



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What Are You Like?
by Anne Enright
"Hauntingly eloquent . . . A rich, rolling prose reminiscent of Dylan Thomas' Under Milkwood. If she keeps writing at this exciting level, the only person Enright will be compared with is herself."—The Seattle Times

Anne Enright is one of the most exciting writers of Ireland's younger generation, a beguiling storyteller The Seattle Times has praised for"the absolutely original way she writes about women and their adventures to know who they are through sex, despair, wit and single-minded courage." In What Are You Like?, Maria Delahunty, raised by her grieving father after her mother died during childbirth, finds herself in her twenties awash in nameless longing and in love with the wrong man. Going through his things, she finds a photograph that will end up unraveling a secret more devastating than her father's long mourning, but more pregnant with possibility. Moving between Dublin, New York, and London, What Are You Like? is a breathtaking novel of twins and irretrievable losses, of a woman haunted by her missing self, and of our helplessness against our fierce connection to our origins. It is a novel, Newsday wrote, that"announces [Enright's] excellence as though it were stamped on the cover in boldface."


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A Peculiar Grace
A Novel
by Jeffrey Lent

An unforgettable tale of love, family secrets, and the hold of the past in a family of New England artists, A Peculiar Grace is the latest triumph from the author of In the Fall, hailed by The Christian Science Monitor and The New York Times as one of the best books of the year. Hewitt Pearce lives alone in his family home, producing custom ironwork and safeguarding a small collection of art his late father left behind. When Jessica, a troubled young vagabond, washes up in his backwoods one morning, Hewitt’s hermetic existence is challenged. As he gradually uncovers Jessica’s secrets and reestablishes contact with a woman he thought he had lost twenty years before, Hewitt must confront his own dark history and rediscover how much he craves human connection. A Peculiar Grace is a remarkable achievement by one of our finest authors, an insightful portrait of family secrets, and a rich tapestry filled with characters who have learned to survive by giving shape to their losses.


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Stories from a Ming Collection
Translations of Chinese Short Stories Published in the Seventeenth Century
by Cyril Birch

The popularity of the Chinese storyteller goes back to the marketplace of the T'ang dynasty, but the familiar figure came into its own in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. This selection of stories from Feng Menglong's collection, Stories Old and New (originally published in 1624), includes representative types of the storyteller's traditional art. "The Pearl-Sewn Shirt" is a cautionary romance describing the tragedy of a broken marriage; the heroic biography, which depicts a neglected man of high worth gradually receiving recognition, is represented by "Wine and Dumplings"; an authentic twelfth-century forerunner of the detective story is found in "The Canary Murders." The other tales concern traffic in the supernatural, didactic admonitions to observe morality in sex and loyalty in friendship, and realistic accounts of the meanness and corruption of official life. Also includes "The Lady Who Was a Beggar," "The Journey of the Corpse," "The Story of Wu Pao-an," and "The Fairy's Rescue."


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A Gentleman's Game
by Tom Coyne
More than just a coming-of-age story, A Gentleman’s Game is a story of fathers and sons, of class and the pressure to succeed in an era of envy, and of the timeless passion for a beguiling and bedeviling game. It is a winning debut novel by an exciting new voice in American fiction.

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Had a Good Time
Stories from American Postcards
by Robert Olen Butler
In Robert Olen Butler’s dazzling new book of stories, Had a Good Time, he explores America by finding artistic inspiration in an unlikely and fascinating place—the backs of postcards from a bygone era.  For many years Butler has collected picture postcards from the early twentieth century—not so much for the pictures on the front but for the messages written on the backs, little bits of the captured souls of people long since passed away. Only Butler could use these brief messages of real people from another age to create fully imagined stories that speak to the universal human condition. From the hilarious “The Ironworkers’ Hayride,” where a young man named Milton dates a girl with a wooden leg, to the eerily familiar “The One in White,” where a newspaper reporter covers an incident of American military adventurism in a foreign land, these are fifteen intimate and fascinating glimpses into the lives of ordinary people in an extraordinary age.

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The Final Confession of Mabel Stark
by Robert Hough
In the 1910s and ’20s, during the golden age of the big top, Mabel Stark was the superstar of the Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus, and one of America’s most eccentric celebrities. A tiny, curvaceous Kentucky blonde in a white leather bodysuit, Mabel was brazen, sexually adventurous, and suicidally courageous. The Final Confession of Mabel Stark is Robert Hough’s brilliant, highly acclaimed novelization of her fantastic life.  It is 1968—Mabel is just turning eighty and is about to lose her job at Jungleland, a Southern California game park. Devastated by the loss of her cats, she looks back on her life and her five husbands: the fifth would one day be tragically mauled by her one true love, her ferocious yet amorous 550-pound Bengal tiger Rajah. Starting with her escape from a mental institution to begin her circus career as a burlesque dancer, Mabel’s exquisitely voiced confession is a live wire of dark secrets, broken dreams, and comic escapades. It is a brilliant, exhilarating story of an America before television and movies, when the spectacle of the circus reigned and an unlikely woman captured the public imagination with her singular charm and audacity.

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The Summer He Didn't Die
by Jim Harrison

Jim Harrison's vivid, tender, and deeply felt fictions have won him acclaim as an American master of the novella. His latest highly acclaimed volume of novellas, The Summer He Didn’t Die, is a sparkling and exuberant collection about love, the senses, and family, no matter how untraditional. In the title novella, “The Summer He Didn’t Die,” Brown Dog, a hapless Michigan Indian, is trying to parent his two stepchildren and take care of his family’s health on meager resources—it helps a bit that his charms are irresistible to the new dentist in town. “Republican Wives” is a wicked satire on the sexual neuroses of the right, the emptiness of a life lived for the status quo, and the irrational power of love that, when thwarted, can turn so easily into an urge to murder. And “Tracking” is a meditation on Harrison’s fascination with place, telling his own familiar mythology through the places his life has seen and the intellectual loves he has known. With wit as sharp and prose as lush as any Harrison has yet written, The Summer He Didn’t Die is a resonant, warm, and joyful ode to our journey on this earth.


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The School on Heart's Content Road
by Carolyn Chute

The School on Heart’s Content Road begins with Mickey Gammon, a fifteen-year-old dropout who has been evicted from home and seeks shelter in the Settlement—a rural cooperative in alternative energy, farm produce, and local goods, founded by “the Prophet.” Falsely demonized by the media as a compound of sin, the Settlement’s true nature remains foreign to outsiders.  There, Mickey meets another deserted child, six-year-old “Secret Agent Jane”—a cunning, beautiful girl whose mother is in jail on false drug charges and who prowls the Settlement in heart-shaped sunglasses, imagining her childish plans to ruin the community will win her mother’s freedom. As they struggle to adjust to their new, complex surrogate family, Mickey and Jane witness the mounting unrest within the Settlement’s ranks, which soon builds to a shocking crescendo.
Vehement and poetic, The School on Heart’s Content Road questions the nature of family, culture, and authority in an intensely diverse nation. It is an urgent plea from those who have been shoved to the fringes of society, but who refuse to be silenced.



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Troll
A Love Story
by Johanna Sinisalo

“A wily thriller-fantasy . . . Each discovery sounds like the voice of a storyteller reminding us of how the gods play with our fates.”—The New York Times

Everyone has their rough nights, but things have clearly taken a turn for the surreal when Angel, a young photographer, finds a group of drunken teenagers in the courtyard of his apartment building, taunting a young troll. Trolls are known in Scandinavian mythology as wild beasts like the werewolf, but this troll is just a small, wounded creature. Angel decides to offer it a safe haven for the night.  In the morning Angel thinks he dreamed it all. But he finds the troll alive, well, and drinking from his toilet. What does one do with a troll in the city? Angel begins researching frantically. Angel searches the Internet, folklore, nature journals, and newspaper clippings, but his research doesn’t tell him that trolls exude pheromones that have  a profound aphrodisiac effect on all those around him. As Angel’s life changes beyond recognition, it becomes clear that the troll is familiar with the man’s most forbidden feelings, and that it may take him across lines he never thought he’d cross. A novel of sparkling originality, Troll is a wry, peculiar, and beguiling story of nature and man’s relationship to wild things, and of the dark power of the wildness in ourselves.


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Sewer, Gas & Electric
The Public Works Trilogy
by Matt Ruff

Sewer, Gas & Electric is the exuberant follow-up to Matt Ruff’s cult classic and critically acclaimed debut Fool on the Hill. High above Manhattan android and human steelworkers are constructing a new Tower of Babel for billionaire Harry Gant, as a monument to humanity’s power to dream. In the festering sewers below a darker game is afoot: a Wall Street takeover artist has been murdered, and Gant’s crusading ex-wife, Joan Fine, has been hired to find out why. The year is 2023, and Ayn Rand has been resurrected and bottled in a hurricane lamp to serve as Joan’s assistant; an eco-terrorist named Philo Dufrense travels in a pink-and-green submarine designed by Howard Hughes; a Volkswagen Beetle is possessed by the spirit of Abbie Hoffman; Meisterbrau, a mutant great white shark, is running loose in the sewers beneath Times Square; and a one-armed 181-year-old Civil War veteran joins Joan and Ayn in their quest for the truth. All of whom, and many more besides, are caught up in a vast conspiracy involving Walt Disney, J. Edgar Hoover, and a mob of homicidal robots.


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Uniform Justice
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon is the internationally best-selling novelist whose ever adroit, big-hearted Venetian detective Commissario Guido Brunetti has captivated fans throughout the world.  As Uniform Justice opens, Brunetti is called to investigate a parent’s worst nightmare. A young cadet has been found hanged, a presumed suicide, in Venice’s elite military academy.  Brunetti’s sorrow for the boy is rivaled only by his contempt for a community that is more concerned with protecting the reputation of the school, and its privileged students, than understanding this tragedy.  Dr. Moro, the boy’s father, is clearly and understandably devastated by his son’s death; but while both he and his apparently estranged wife seem convinced that the boy’s death could not have been suicide, neither appears eager to talk to the police or involve Brunetti in any investigation.  As Brunetti pursues his inquiry, he is faced with a wall of silence. Is the military protecting its own? And what of the other witnesses? Is this the natural reluctance of Italians to involve themselves with the authorities, or is Brunetti facing a conspiracy far greater than this one death?

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Ruby River
by Lynn Pruett Carnegie Ce


Ruby River
drops us into a small town during a blistering Alabama summer. Hattie Bohannon has just opened a truck stop—a magnet for transients of questionable background and inclination, some say, and an uneasy presence in tradition-bound, gossipy Maridoches. Hattie is quietly mourning her recently dead husband, while her strong-willed daughters—whose burgeoning sexuality is attracting attention from some of the truck stop patrons—keep her at loose ends. In a season of unrelenting heat, desire gestates and hovers over Maridoches, threatening the moral equilibrium of the small church town. When Hattie’s oldest daughter, Jessamine, is falsely accused of prostitution, the Reverend Peterson and his congregation protest the immorality of the Bohannons and their establishment. Crackling with the energy and spark of strong, colorful characters whose lives are continually colliding, Ruby River is a poignant, uplifting story by a writer of extraordinary generosity of spirit and earthy wit.


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Midnight Cactus
by Bella Pollen

The best-selling author of Hunting Unicorns returns with a stirring and suspenseful tale of love and the quest for freedom, vividly set in the wild lands between Arizona and the Mexican border. On the run from her claustrophobic marriage in London, Alice Coleman moves her two small children to the American desert hoping to find the solitude she craves but hadn’t thought possible. But the vast and unruly southwest has room for the dreams of more than one fugitive—from Benjamin, an abandoned mining town’s Mexican caretaker, to the immigrants who risk their lives to cross the border, to the laconic cowboy Duval, who Alice finds herself falling for. What seemed idyllic turns deadly as Alice must decide how much she is willing to sacrifice in order to preserve not only her freedom, but Benjamin and Duvall’s as well. Building to a blistering climax, Midnight Cactus is both a perilous love story and a compelling exploration of the tension between unrealized dreams and the pull of family.


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The Waters of Eternal Youth
by Donna Leon

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Doctored Evidence
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon’s riveting new novel, Doctored Evidence, follows Commissario Guido Brunetti down the winding streets of contemporary Venice as he throws open the doors of a case his superiors would rather leave closed. When a miserly spinster is found brutally murdered in her Venice apartment, police immediately suspect her Romanian housekeeper. They are certain their job is done after the immigrant dies while fleeing arrest, but weeks later, a neighbor comes forward to defend the innocence of the accused. The only investigator who believes the alibi is Brunetti, who will have to go behind the backs of his superiors to vindicate the Romanian and find her employer’s actual killer.  As always, the indispensable hacking skills of the ever-loyal Signorina Elettra are the perfect complement to Brunetti’s meticulous detective work. Doctored Evidence is charged with suspense and evokes a contemporary Venice with Donna Leon’s masterful flair.  

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The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ
by Philip Pullman
The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ is the remarkable new piece of fiction from best-selling and famously atheistic author Philip Pullman. By challenging the events of the gospels, Pullman puts forward his own compelling and plausible version of the life of Jesus, and in so doing, does what all great books do: makes the reader ask questions.
     In Pullman’s own words, “The story I tell comes out of the tension within the dual nature of Jesus Christ, but what I do with it is my responsibility alone. Parts of it read like a novel, parts like history, and parts like a fairy tale; I wanted it to be like that because it is, among other things, a story about how stories become stories.”
     Written with unstinting authority, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ is a pithy, erudite, subtle, and powerful book by a controversial and beloved author. It is a text to be read and reread, studied and unpacked, much like the Good Book itself.


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The Hole We're In
by Gabrielle Zevin
With The Hole We’re In—a bold, timeless, yet all too timely novel about a troubled American family navigating an even more troubled America—award-winning author and screenwriter, Gabrielle Zevin, delivers a work that places her in the ranks of our shrewdest social observers and top literary talents. Meet the Pomeroys: a church-going family living in a too-red house in a Texas college town. Roger, the patriarch, has impulsively gone back to school, only to find his future ambitions at odds with the temptations of the present. His wife, Georgia, tries to keep things afloat at home, but she’s been feeding the bill drawer with unopened envelopes for months and never manages to confront its swelling contents. In an attempt to climb out of the holes they’ve dug, Roger and Georgia make a series of choices that have catastrophic consequences for their three children—especially for Patsy, the youngest, who will spend most of her life fighting to overcome them. The Hole We’re In shines a spotlight on some of the most relevant issues of today: over-reliance on credit, gender and class politics, and the war in Iraq. But it is Zevin’s deft exploration of the fragile economy of family life that makes this a book for the ages.

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Eden
by Olympia Vernon
Olympia Vernon’s fearless and wildly original debut novel explodes on the first page and sustains a tightrope intensity until the last. Eden is a lyrical tale about a young black girl in the Deep South who comes to confront the realities of sex, race, disease, and mortality. When fourteen-year-old Maddy Dangerfield draws a naked woman on the pages of Genesis in fire-engine-red lipstick during Sunday school, the rural black community of Pyke County, Mississippi, is scandalized. Her mother, mortified by the small-town gossip and determined to teach Maddy the perils of her youthful intelligence, forces her to spend weekends from then on caring for her estranged Aunt Pip, an outcast who lives on the wrong side of town and is dying of cancer. The lessons Maddy learns are ones that could not be taught in any church.  In lush, vivid brushstrokes, Olympia Vernon conjures a world that is both intoxicating and cruel, and illuminates the bittersweet transformation of the young girl who must bear the burden and blessing of its secrets too soon. Eden is a haunting, memorable novel propelled by the poetry and power of a voice that is complex, lyrical, and utterly true.

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Rhode Island Blues
by Fay Weldon

Smart, sexy, and infinitely charming, Rhode Island Blues tells the story of Sophia Moore, a loveless and guarded thirty-four-year-old film editor in London who believes her only living relative is her stormy and wild grandmother, Felicity. Troubled by her mother’s long-ago suicide and her father’s abandonment, Sophia overworks, incessantly contemplates her past, and continues a flat sexual affair with the famous director of her latest film. But when she travels to Rhode Island to help her grandmother settle into a retirement center, she begins to unravel mysteries about her family history that she never knew, while finding relatives she had no idea existed. 


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The Marrying of Chani Kaufman
by Eve Harris
The Marrying of Chani Kaufman is a debut originally published by a small independent Scottish press that is already garnering significant attention worldwide.

London, 2008. Chani Kaufman is a nineteen-year-old woman, betrothed to Baruch Levy, a young man whom she has seen only four times before their wedding day. The novel begins with Chani wearing a wedding dress that has been passed between members of her family and has the yellowed underarms and rows of alteration stitches to prove it. All of the cups of cold coffee and small talk with suitors have led up to this moment. But the happiness Chani and Baruch feel is more than counterbalanced by their anxiety: about the realities of married life; about whether they will be able to have fewer children than Chani’s mother, who has eight daughters; and, most frighteningly, about the unknown, unspeakable secrets of the wedding night. As the book moves back to tell the story of Chani and Baruch’s unusual courtship, it throws into focus a very different couple: Rabbi Chaim Zilberman and his wife, Rebbetzin Rivka Zilberman. As Chani and Baruch prepare for a shared lifetime, Chaim and Rivka struggle to keep their marriage alive—and all four, together with the rest of the community, face difficult decisions about the place of faith and family life in the contemporary world.



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Witches on the Road Tonight
by Sheri Holman
As a child growing up in Depression-era rural Virginia, Eddie Alley’s quiet life is rooted in the rumors of his mother’s vengeful witchcraft. But when he's visited by a writer and glamorous photographer researching American folklore for the WPA, the spell of his mother’s unorthodox life is violently disrupted, and Eddie is inspired to pursue a future beyond the confines of his dead-end town. He leaves for New York and becomes a television horror-movie presenter beloved for his kitschy comedy. Though expert at softening terror for his young fans, Eddie cannot escape the guilty secrets of his own childhood. When he opens his family’s door to a homeless teenager working as an intern at the TV station, the boy’s presence not only awakens something in Eddie, but also in his twelve-year-old daughter, Wallis, who has begun to feel a strange kinship to her notorious grandmother. As the ghost stories of one generation infiltrate the next, Wallis and Eddie grapple with the sins of the past to repair their misguided attempts at loyalty and redemption. In Witches on the Road Tonight, bestselling author Sheri Holman teases out the dark compulsions and desperate longings that blur the line between love and betrayal.

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A Noble Radiance
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

Donna Leon has topped European bestseller lists for more than a decade with a series of mysteries featuring clever Commissario Guido Brunetti. Always ready to bend the rules to uncover the threads of a crime, Brunetti manages to maintain his integrity while maneuvering through a city rife with politics, corruption, and intrigue. In A Noble Radiance a new landowner is summoned urgently to his house not far from Venice when workmen accidentally unearth a macabre grave. The human corpse is badly decomposed, but a ring found nearby proves to be a first clue that reopens an infamous case of kidnapping involving one of Venice's most aristocratic families. Only Commissario Brunetti can unravel the clues and find his way into both the heart of patrician Venice and that of a family grieving for their abducted son


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How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone
by Sasa Stanisic

The hardcover publication of How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone launched Stanisic as an exciting and important new voice in literary fiction and earned exuberant praise from readers and critics alike. Now in paperback, Stanisic’s debut about a boy who experiences the Bosnian War and finds the secret to survival in language and stories is bound to dazzle a whole new readership. 
For Aleksandar Krsmanovic, Grandpa Slavko’s stories endow life in Višegrad with a kaleidoscopic brilliance. Neighbors, friends, and family past and present take on a mythic quality; the River Drina courses through town like the pulse of life itself. So when his grandfather dies suddenly, Aleksandar promises to carry on the tradition. But then soldiers invade Višegrad—a town previously unconscious of racial and religious divides—and it’s no longer important that Aleksandar is the best magician in the nonaligned states; suddenly it is important to have the right last name and to convince the soldiers that Asija, the Muslim girl who turns up in his apartment building, is his sister.
Alive with the magic of childhood, the surreality of war and exile, and the power of language, every page of this glittering novel thrums with the joy of storytelling.



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The Driftless Area
A Novel
by Tom Drury
The new novel from the award-winning author of The End of Vandalism is a wry and sophisticated heist drama. Set in the rugged region of the Midwest that gives the novel its title, The Driftless Area is the story of Pierre Hunter, a young bartender with unfailing optimism, a fondness for coin tricks, and an uncanny capacity for finding trouble. When  he falls in love, with the mysterious and isolated Stella Rosmarin, Pierre becomes the central player in a revenge drama he must unravel and bring to its shocking conclusion. Along the way he will liberate $77,000 from a murderous thief, summon the resources that have eluded him all his life, and come to question the very meaning of chance and mortality. For nothing is as it seems in The Driftless Area. Identities shift, violent secrets lie in wait, the future can cause the past, and love becomes a mission that can take you beyond this world. In its tender, cool irony, The Driftless Area recalls the best of neonoir, and its cast of bona fide small-town eccentrics adrift in the American Midwest make for a clever and deeply pleasurable read from one of our most beloved authors.

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Allan Stein
by Matthew Stadler
A story of art-world detective work and sexual obsession, set against the shifting backgrounds of Paris in the present and in the heady days of the Lost Generation.

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I Married You for Happiness
by Lily Tuck
Throughout Lily Tuck’s wide-ranging and award-winning career, she has been praised by critics for her crisp, lean language and her sensuous explorations of exotic locales and complex psychologies. From Siam to Paraguay and beyond, Tuck inspires her readers to travel into unfamiliar realms. Her newest novel is no exception. In I Married You for Happiness, marriage, mathematics, and memory coalesce to create her most accessible, riveting, and deeply moving book yet.

“His hand is growing cold, still she holds it,” is how this story of a marriage begins. The tale unfolds over a single night, while Nina sits at the bedside of her husband, Philip, whose sudden and unexpected death is the reason for her lonely vigil. Too shocked yet to grieve, she lets herself remember the defining moments of their long marriage, beginning with their first meeting in Paris. She is an artist, he a highly accomplished mathematician—it was a collision of two different worlds that merged to form an intricate and passionate love. As the reader is drawn through select memories—real and imagined—of events that occurred in places as distant and disparate as France, Wisconsin, Hong Kong, Mexico, and California, Tuck reveals the most private intimacies, dark secrets, and overwhelming joys that shaped the lives of Nina and Philip.

Slender, powerful, and utterly engaging, I Married You for Happiness is not only a moving elegy to a man and a marriage, but also a meditation on the theory of probability and how chance can affect both a life and one’s consideration of the possibility of an afterlife.



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Pig Island
by Mo Hayder

The acclaimed author of The Devil of Nanking returns with a riveting, disturbing thriller of religious fanatics, hoax debunkers, and the dark side of belief.  Journalist Joe Oakes makes a living exposing supernatural hoaxes, but when he visits a secretive religious community on a remote Scottish island, everything he thought he knew is overturned.  On the trial of a strange creature caught briefly on film, so deformed it can hardly be human, Oakes crosses a border of electrical fencing, toxin-filled oil drums, and pigs’ skulls to infiltrate the territory of the groups’ isolated founder, Malachi Dove. Their confrontation, and its violent aftermath, is so catastrophic that it forces Oakes to question the nature of evil—and whether he might be responsible for the heinous crime about to unfold.  Startling and uncompromising, Pig Island confirms Mo Hayder as one of the most talented, compelling thriller writers now working.


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Death in a Strange Country
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Early one morning Commissario Guido Brunetti of the Venice Police confronts a grisly sight when the body of a young man is fished out of a fetid canal. All the clues point to a violent mugging, but for Brunetti the motive of robbery seems altogether too convenient. When something is discovered in the victim’s apartment that suggests the existence of a high-level conspiracy, Brunetti becomes convinced that somebody, somewhere, is taking great pains to provide a ready-made solution to the crime. Rich with atmosphere and marvelous plotting, Death in a Strange Country is a superb novel in Donna Leon’s chilling Venetian mystery series.



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The Lost Saints of Tennessee
A Novel
by Amy Franklin-Willis
With enormous heart and dazzling agility, debut novelist Amy Franklin-Willis expertly mines the fault lines in one Southern working-class family. Driven by the soulful and intrepid voices of forty-two-year-old Ezekiel Cooper and his mother, Lillian, The Lost Saints of Tennessee journeys from the 1940s to the 1980s as it follows Zeke’s evolution from anointed son to honorable sibling to unhinged middle-aged man.

After Zeke loses his twin brother in a mysterious drowning and his wife to divorce, only ghosts remain in his hometown of Clayton, Tennessee. Zeke makes the decision to leave town in a final attempt to escape his pain, puts his two treasured possessions—a childhood copy of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tucker, his dead brother’s ancient dog—into his truck, and heads east. He leaves behind two young daughters and his estranged mother, who reveals her own conflicting view of the Cooper family story in a vulnerable but spirited voice stricken by guilt over old sins as she clings to the hope that her family isn’t beyond repair.

When Zeke finds refuge with his sympathetic cousins in Virginia horse country, divine acts in the form of severe weather, illness, and a new romance collide, leading Zeke to a crossroads where he must decide the fate of his family —either by clinging to the way life was or moving toward what life might be.

Written with abundant charm, warmth, and authority, The Lost Saints of Tennessee is the story of a unique brotherhood and a moving consideration of the ways grief can first devastate and then restore.



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The Memory of Love
by Aminatta Forna
 Aminatta Forna has established herself as one of the most breathtaking writers out of Africa today, winning readers’ hearts and critical acclaim. Now, in her newest novel, The Memory of Love, she evokes the haunting atmosphere of a country at war, and the powerful stories of two generations of African life. In contemporary Sierra Leone, a devastating civil war has left an entire populace with terrible secrets to keep. In the capital hospital Kai, a gifted young surgeon is plagued by demons that are beginning to threaten his livelihood. Elsewhere in the hospital lies Elias Cole, a man who was young during the country’s turbulent postcolonial years and has stories to tell that are far from heroic. As past and present intersect in the buzzing city, Kai and Elias are drawn unwittingly closer by Adrian, a British psychiatrist with good intentions, and into the path of one woman at the center of their stories. A work of extraordinary writing and rare wisdom, The Memory of Love seamlessly weaves together the lives of these three men to create a powerful story of loss, absolution, and the indelible effects of the past—and, at the end of it all, the very nature of love.



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Big Girls Don't Cry
by Fay Weldon
One balmy evening in 1971, an unlikely group of women meet in a cramped living room in the suburbs of London. There’s Layla, a sexy, irreverent bombshell; Alice, a serious academic; Zoë, a new mother who’s frightened of her feminist-hating husband; Stephanie, a pretty, soft-spoken wife of a womanizing antiques dealer; and Nancy, newly single after leaving her no-sex-before-marriage fiancé at their London youth hostel. All twenty-something, all fed up with their lives and their men, they decide to form Medusa, a feminist publishing house.

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Vida
by Patricia Engel
Fresh, accomplished, and fearless, Vida marks the debut of Patricia Engel, a young author of immense talent and promise. Vida follows a single narrator, Sabina, as she navigates her shifting identity as a daughter of the Colombian diaspora and struggles to find her place within and beyond the net of her strong, protective, but embattled family. In “Lucho,” Sabina’s family—already “foreigners in a town of blancos”—is shunned by the community when a relative commits an unspeakable act of violence, but she is in turn befriended by the town bad boy who has a secret of his own; in “Desaliento,” Sabina surrounds herself with other young drifters who spend their time looking for love and then fleeing from it—until reality catches up with one of them; and in “Vida,” the urgency of Sabina’s self-imposed exile in Miami fades when she meets an enigmatic Colombian woman with a tragic past. Patricia Engel maps landscapes both actual (New Jersey, New York, Miami, Bogotá) and interior in this stunning debut, and the constant throughout is Sabina—serious, witty, alternately cautious and reckless, open to transformation yet skeptical of its lasting power. Infused by a hard-won, edgy wisdom, Vida introduces a sensational new literary voice.

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Sunset Over Chocolate Mountains
by Susan Elderkin

Theobald Moon lives in a lonely corner of the Arizona desert tending his spectacular cactus garden, his tiny mobile home, and his astounding appetite. He has fled a stifled, cardigan-and-tea-cozy life in south London for this unfamiliar country and is raising Josephine, who has known no other life than their cheerful yet isolated American one. But when a jangling ice-cream truck finds its way into the desert carrying two ill-fated lovers—one a pregnant Slovakian shoemaker and the other a mysterious ice-cream man—it throws Theo and Josie's careful lives into a chaotic state. Fantastic upheaval ensues, and an inspired redemption.
Sunset Over Chocolate Mountains is innovative and accessible, funny and profound, Elderkin's story explores love and responsibility, and the joys and fears those emotions inspire. It is a rare and tantalizing first novel.


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The River
by Tricia Wastvedt

“Threat and suspense are juxtaposed with lyrical romanticism . . . a [deft] fusion of gothic and rhapsodic.” —Kirkus Reviews

Tricia Wastvedt’s debut novel, met with critical acclaim in England, is a hypnotically readable portrait of a community scarred, but eventually reawakened, by its grief. Two children drown during the summer of 1958 in the English village of Cameldip. Their parents, Isabel and Robert, are bound together in guilt and anger, and as the years pass, the tragedy weaves itself into the invisible fabric of village life. Robert, finding solace in labor, builds several tree houses that transform the look of the town, and as the years pass the structures grow entwined with other houses. It is thirty years after the tragedy when Anna, a young pregnant woman escaping her life in London, arrives in Cameldip and is taken in by Isabel. As Anna slowly uncovers the secrets of the town’s past, she becomes inexorably drawn into the conflict in which Isabel and Robert have been locked for three decades. A story of families, old scars, and new beginnings, The River is a lyrical and haunting tale of betrayal, failure, love, and fortitude.


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The Translator
by Leila Aboulela
“A lyrical journey about exile, loss, and love . . . poetry in motion.” —The Sunday Times (London)
American readers were introduced to the award-winning Sudanese author Leila Aboulela with Minaret, a delicate tale of a privileged young African Muslim woman adjusting to her new life as a maid in London. Now, for the first time in North America, we step back to her extraordinarily assured debut about a widowed Muslim mother living in Aberdeen who falls in love with a Scottish secular academic. Sammar is a Sudanese widow working as an Arabic translator at a Scottish university. Since the sudden death of her husband, her young son has gone to live with family in Khartoum, leaving Sammar alone in cold, gray Aberdeen, grieving and isolated. But when she begins to translate for Rae, a Scottish Islamic scholar, the two develop a deep friendship that awakens in Sammar all the longing for life she has repressed. As Rae and Sammar fall in love, she knows they will have to address his lack of faith in all that Sammar holds sacred. An exquisitely crafted meditation on love, both human and divine, The Translator is ultimately the story of one woman’s courage to stay true to her beliefs, herself, and her newfound love.



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As God Commands
by Niccolò Ammaniti
From the internationally best-selling author of I’m Not Scared comes a dizzying and compulsively readable novel set in a moribund town in industrial Italy, where a father and son contend with a hostile world and their own inner demons. The economically depressed village of Varrano, where Cristiano Zena lives with his hard-drinking, out-of-work father, Rino, is a world away from the picturesque towns of travel-brochure Italy. When Rino and his rough-edged cronies Danilo and Quattro Formaggi come up with a plan to reverse all their fortunes, Cristiano wonders if maybe their lives are poised for deliverance after all.  But the plan goes horribly awry. On a night of apocalyptic weather, each character will act in a way that will have irreversible consequences for themselves and others, and Cristiano will find his life changed forever, and not in the way he had hoped. Gritty and relentless, As God Commands moves at breakneck speed, blending brutal violence, dark humor, and surprising tenderness. With clear-eyed affection, Niccolò Ammaniti introduces a cast of unforgettable characters trapped at the crossroads of hope and despair.

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Tokyo Cancelled
by Rana Dasgupta

“The stranded passengers . . . trade the sort of stories that strangers don’t typically swap, unless one’s fellow travelers are Beckett and Borges. . . . His sprawling, experimental project achieves an exotic luster.” —Publishers Weekly

Thirteen passengers are stranded at an airport. Tokyo, their destination, is covered in snow and all flights are cancelled. To pass the night they form a huddle by the silent baggage carousels and tell one another stories. Thus begins Rana Dasgupta’s Canterbury Tales for our times. In the spirit of Borges and Calvino, Dasgupta’s writing combines an energetically modern landscape with a timeless, beguiling fairy-tale ethos, while bringing to life a cast of extraordinary individuals—some lost, some confused, some happy—in a world that remains ineffable, inexplicable, and wonderful. A Ukrainian merchant is led by a wingless bird back to a lost lover; Robert De Niro’s son masters the transubstantiation of matter and turns it against his enemies; a man who manipulates other people’s memories has to confront his own past; a Japanese entrepreneur risks losing everything in his obsession with a doll; a mute Turkish girl is left alone in the house of a German man who is mapping the world. Told by people on a journey, these are stories about lives in transit, stories that grow into an epic cycle about the hopes and dreams and disappointments that connect people everywhere.


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Bitter Fruit
by Achmat Dangor
With the publication of Kafka’s Curse, Achmat Dangor established himself as an utterly singular voice in South African fiction. His new novel, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the IMPAC-Dublin Literary Award, is a clear-eyed, witty, yet deeply serious look at South Africa’s political history and its damaging legacy in the lives of those who live there. The last time Silas Ali encountered Lieutenant Du Boise, Silas was locked in the back of a police van and the lieutenant was conducting a vicious assault on Silas’s wife, Lydia, in revenge for her husband’s participation in Nelson Mandela’s African National Congress. When Silas sees Du Boise by chance twenty years later, as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is about to deliver its report, crimes from the past erupt into the present, splintering the Alis’ fragile peace. Meanwhile Silas and Lydia’s son, Mikey, a thoroughly contemporary young hip-hop lothario, contends in unforeseen ways with his parents’ pasts. A harrowing story of a brittle family on the crossroads of history and a fearless skewering of the pieties of revolutionary movements, Bitter Fruit is a cautionary tale of how we do, or do not, address the past’s deepest wounds.

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Waiting for Godot: A Bilingual Edition
by Samuel Beckett
From an inauspicious beginning at the tiny Left Bank Theatre de Babylone in 1953, followed by bewilderment by American and British audiences, Waiting for Godot has become one of the most important and enigmatic plays of the past fifty years and a cornerstone of twentieth-century drama. Now in honor of the centenary of Samuel Beckett’s birth, Grove Press is publishing a bilingual edition of the play. Originally written in French, Beckett translated the work himself, and in doing so chose to revise and eliminate various passages. With side-by-side text the reader can experience the mastery of Beckett’s language and explore the nuances of his creativity. Upon being asked who Godot is, Samuel Beckett told Alan Schneider, “If I knew, I would have said so in the play.” Although we may never know who we are waiting for, in this special edition we can rediscover one of the most magical and beautiful allegories of our time.

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The New Valley
Novellas
by Josh Weil
The three linked novellas that comprise Josh Weil’s masterful debut bring us into America’s remote and often unforgiving backcountry, and delicately open up the private worlds of three very different men as they confront love, loss, and their own personal demons.
          Set in the hardscrabble hill country between the Virginias, The New Valley is populated by characters striving to forge new lives in the absence of those they have loved. Told in three varied and distinct voices— from a soft-spoken middle-aged beef farmer struggling to hold himself together after his dad’s death; to a health-obsessed single father desperate to control his reckless, overweight daughter; to a mildly retarded man who falls in love with a married woman intent on using him in a scheme that will wound them both—each novella is a vivid, stand-alone examination of Weil’s uniquely romanticized relationships. As the men battle against grief and solitude, their heartache leads them all to commit acts that will bring both ruin and salvation.
          Written with a deeply American tone, focused attention to story, and veneration for character, The New Valley is a tender exploration of survival, isolation, and the deep, consuming ache for human connection.


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Wanting
A Novel
by Richard Flanagan

One of our most inventive and important international literary voices, Richard Flanagan now delivers Wanting, a powerful and moving tale of colonialism, ambition, and the lusts and longings that make us human.
          It is 1841. In the remote penal colony of Van Diemen’s Land, a barefoot aboriginal girl sits for a portrait in a red silk dress. She is Mathinna, the adopted daughter of the island’s governor, Sir John Franklin, and his wife, Lady Jane, and the subject of a grand experiment in civilization—one that will determine whether science, Christianity, and reason can be imposed on savagery, impulse, and desire.  Years later, somewhere in the Arctic, Sir John Franklin has disappeared with his crew and two ships on an expedition to find the fabled Northwest Passage. England is horrified by reports of cannibalism filtering back from search parties, no one more so than the most celebrated novelist of the day, Charles Dickens, for whom Franklin’s story becomes a means to plumb the frozen depths of his own life.





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Ancestor Stones
by Aminatta Forna
Aminatta Forna, whose moving and gorgeously written memoir garnered international attention, has seamlessly turned her hand to fiction in Ancestor Stones, a novel that is lush and beautiful, a touching and intimate portrait of several generations of African women.  A young woman from Africa who has lived in England for many years and is married to a British man returns to visit her family after years of civil war. She is given an unprecedented look into the lives of the women in her family as her aunts Mary, Hawa, Asana, and Serah—women who were mysterious and a bit intimidating to her younger self—begin to tell her their stories. Bit by bit, a family history and a history of their homeland emerge—of a society both ancient and modern, of a family of strong women refusing to live as second-class citizens.  Forna has created a powerful, sensuous novel that beautifully captures Africa’s past century and its present, and the legacy that her daughters take with them wherever they live. A wonderful achievement recalling The God of Small Things and The Joy Luck Club, it establishes Aminatta Forna as a gifted novelist.

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The Amphora Project
by William Kotzwinkle
Deep in the bowels of Junk Moon, the finest scientists of Planet Immortal are nearing completion of Project Amphora, which aims to unlock the secret of immortality. The Project is run by the Consortium, twelve of the planet’s most influential movers and shakers, but they aren’t the only ones after immortality. Commander Jockey Old­castle, a wise-cracking space pirate, has heard about the Amphora Project from a banished scientist who is convinced it will lead to the end of the world. Oldcastle sets off to find the project with Adrian Link, a timid botanist who wants only to tend to his plants on the Agricultural Plain, yet Oldcastle finds himself trying to unravel a strange mystery: It seems the Amphora Project is turning the citizens of Planet Immortal into crystal. As time runs out, it is up to Oldcastle and Link— and Link’s exotic, unlikely love interest—to stop their mysterious extra­dimensional enemy before their world is lost forever. Hilarious, wildly inventive, and featuring a fantastical cast of mutants, quasi­human robots, intergalactic mercenaries, and two-thousand-year-old immortals, The Amphora Project is a novel that combines elements of science fiction and fantasy and transcends the boundaries of both.

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The Lieutenant
by Kate Grenville

A stunning follow-up to her Commonwealth Writers’ Prize-winning book, The Secret River, Grenville’s The Lieutenant is a gripping story about friendship, self-discovery, and the power of language set along the unspoiled shores of 1788 New South Wales. As a boy, Daniel Rooke was an outsider. Ridiculed in school and misunderstood by his parents, Daniel could only hope that he would one day find his place in life. When he joins the marines and travels to Australia as a lieutenant on the First Fleet, Daniel finally sees his chance for a new beginning. As his countrymen struggle to control their cargo of convicts and communicate with nearby Aboriginal tribes, Daniel constructs an observatory to chart the stars and begin the work he prays will make him famous. But the place where they have landed will prove far more revelatory than the night sky. Out on his isolated point, Daniel comes to intimately know the local Aborigines and forges a remarkable connection with one girl that will change the course of his life. The Lieutenant is a remarkable story about the poignancy of a friendship that defies linguistic and cultural barriers, and shows one man that he is capable of exceptional courage.


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Maggie Darling
A Modern Romance
by James Howard Kunstler
She’s the goddess of hearth and home, America’s millionaire media maven of domesticity, Connecticut’s most dazzling hostess, and everything in her world must be perfect—except that Maggie Darling’s enviable life has suddenly gone off the rails. Amid the extravagant buffets of a Yuletide bash for two hundred, she spies her scoundrel investment banker husband Kenneth slipping out of a powder room behind creamy young Laura Wilkie. He is, shall we say, not forgiven.  Matrimonial meltdown launches Maggie on a year of romance and misadventure, including a Venetian fling with British rock star Frederick Swann, entanglement with the gangsta rap group Chill Az Def, and a fiendish seduction by—of all people—her dashing book editor, Harold Hamish, amid the trappings of a Vermont country weekend complete with fly rods and really good chardonnay. Meanwhile, a sniper is on the loose along the suburban freeways, and the Businessmen’s Lunch Posse is robbing the patrons of Manhattan’s four-star restaurants, and famous friends are losing their heads on Central Park West. Can Maggie brilliantly resolve the collapse of civilization as we wish we knew it? Maggie Darling is a hilarious and perfectly refreshing modern novel of manners.

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Winterton Blue
A Novel
by Trezza Azzopardi

“Beryl Bainbridge, Muriel Spark and Graham Greene all come to mind, but Azzopardi’s style is all her own, she never sacrifices sensuous description to her thrifty spareness. The smallest object refracts into a kaleidoscopic world. . . . Azzopardi . . . is proving herself to be a formidable addition to the tradition of fine novelists of the sort Forster would approve.” ––The Chicago Tribune

A New York Times Editors’ Choice, the breathtaking third novel from Booker Prize finalist and national best-selling author Trezza Azzopardi is at once a powerful love story and an intricately plotted mystery that explores the staying power of family and memory, and the pull of unlikely but destined romance. For twenty years Lewis has been haunted by his brother’s death. Try as he might to escape this tragedy, the ghost of Wayne confronts him at every turn. When he meets Anna, a young woman who is also haunted—by her loud and carefree mother, Rita, who just so happens to be very much alive—Lewis is pulled into a world of carousing, music hall turns, and cocktails as he searches for the person he believes responsible for the death of his brother. Against the backdrop of the Norfolk coast with its massive skies and relentless seas, Anna and Lewis slowly learn to trust each other and accept that an uncertain future can be as wild and alluring as the landscape they have grown to love.


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Bottomland
by Michelle Hoover
At once intimate and sweeping, Bottomland follows the Hess family in the years after World War I, as they attempt to rid themselves of the Anti-German sentiment that left a stain on their name. But when the youngest two daughters vanish in the middle of the night, the family must piece together what happened while struggling to maintain their life on the unforgiving Iowa plains. In the weeks after Esther and Myrle’s disappearance, their siblings desperately search for them, through the stark farmlands to unfamiliar world of far-off Chicago. Have the girls run away to another farm? Have they gone to the city to seek a new life? Or were they abducted? Ostracized and misunderstood in their small town in the wake of the war, the Hesses fear the worst.

Bottomland is a haunting story of pride, love, and betrayal, set among the rugged terrain of Iowa, the fields of war-torn Flanders, and the bustling Chicago streets. With exquisite lyricism, Michelle Hoover deftly examines the intrepid ways a person can forge a life of one's own despite the dangerous obstacles of prejudice and oppression.



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Acqua Alta
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
As Venice braces for a winter tempest, Commissario Guido Brunetti, Donna Leon's intrepid Italian sleuth, finds out that an old friend has been savagely beaten at the palazzo home of reigning diva Flavia Petrelli. Then, as the flood waters rise, a corpse is discovered—and Brunetti must wade through the chaotic city to solve his deadliest case yet. Sinister and exotic, Acqua Alta is another chilling addition to Donna Leon's best-selling series.



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Coming of Age at the End of Days
by Alice LaPlante
Alice LaPlante’s acclaimed psychological thrillers are distinguished by their stunning synthesis of family drama and engrossing suspense. Her new novel, Coming of Age at the End of Days, is an incisive foray deeper into the creases of family life—and the light-and-dark battle of faith—as LaPlante delves into the barbed psyche of a teenager whose misguided convictions bear irrevocable consequences.

Never one to conform, Anna always had trouble fitting in. Earnest and willful, as a young girl she quickly learned how to hide her quirks from her parents and friends. But when, at sixteen, a sudden melancholia takes hold of her life, she loses her sense of self and purpose. Then the Goldschmidts move in next door. They’re active members of a religious cult, and Anna is awestruck by both their son, Lars, and their fervent violent prophecies for the Tribulation at the End of Days. Within months, everything in Anna’s life—her family, her home, her very identity—will undergo profound changes. But when her newfound beliefs threaten to push her over the edge, she must find the strength to come back to center with the help of unlikely friends: Jim, a childhood crush wading through a quarter-life crisis in his parents’ basement, and Clara, her compassionate chemistry teacher desperate for adventure.

An intimate story of destruction and renewal, LaPlante delivers a haunting exploration of family legacies, devotion, and tangled relationships. She once again brilliantly parses an altered mind on the brink and considers the often perilous, always challenging journey to become the people we want to be at the end of our days.



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After You've Gone
A Novel
by Jeffrey Lent

A brave portrayal of a man finding hope in the midst of life-changing tragedy, After You’ve Gone has been hailed as “truly an emotional journey” (Star-Tribune, Minneapolis). After You’ve Gone is a moving, sublime love story set in the cataclysmic decades around the turn of the twentieth century. Henry Dorn has spent years building a family, but it only takes a single afternoon for it to fall apart. Abruptly widowed of the love of his life, Henry buys a steamer ticket for Amsterdam, the city of his heritage, hoping to start life anew. But nothing could have prepared him for the woman he meets on the ship: the fiery, self-sufficient Lydia Pearce, one of a new generation of women. Before long the two have fallen into an affair of a depth and significance for which neither was prepared. But the memory of his wife and the vexed relationship he had with their son haunt Henry in the midst of his new beginning. Jeffrey Lent is one of our finest novelists, and After You’ve Gone delivers a tale that beautifully charts the sweep of a life, the grim reach of a war, and the discovery—and loss—of life-defining love.



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Remembering the Bones
by Frances Itani

Best-selling author Frances Itani’s second novel is a beautifully written, moving tale of the staying power of family through time and memory, and the extent to which individual lives can influence and resonate in the world around them. Born on the exact same day as Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, Canadian Georgina Witley is invited to an eightieth birthday lunch at Buckingham Palace. All she has to do is drive to the airport and board the plane for London. Except that Georgie drives off the edge of the road, her car plunging into a thickly wooded ravine. Thrown from the car, injured, and unable to move, she must rely on her full store of family memories, her no-nonsense wit, and a recitation of the names of the bones in her body—an exercise from childhood—to remind her she is still alive. As Georgina lies stranded and helpless, she reflects on her role as a daughter, mother, sister, wife, and widow, on lost loves and painful secrets.


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A Carnivore's Inquiry
A Novel
by Sabina Murray
Sabina Murray’s first book since she won the PEN/Faulkner Award for The Caprices seduces with its dark delight in her taboo subject. When we meet Katherine, the winning—and rather disturbing—twenty-three-year-old narrator of A Carnivore’s Inquiry, she has just left Italy and arrived in New York City, but what has propelled her there is a mystery. Katherine’s occasional allusions to a frighteningly eccentric mother and tyrannical father suggest a somberness at the center of her otherwise flippant and sardonic demeanor. Soon restless, she begins journeying from literary New York to rural Maine and Mexico City, trailed, everywhere she goes, by a string of murders. As the ritualistic killings begin to pile up, Katherine comforts and inspires herself by meditating on cannibalism in literature, art, and history. The story races toward a hair-raising conclusion, while Katherine, and the reader, close in on the reasons for both her and her mother’s fascination with aberrant, violent behavior.  A brilliantly subtle commentary on twenty-first-century consumerism and Western culture’s obsession with new frontiers, A Carnivore’s Inquiry is an unsettling exploration of the questionable appetites that lurk beneath the veneer of civilization..

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A Good Man
by Guy Vanderhaeghe
Best-selling author Guy Vanderhaeghe’s final installment in his frontier trilogy is at once a riveting account of personal and historic revenge, and the endearing story of an unlikely love affair.

Wesley Case, a former soldier and the son of a Canadian lumber baron, sets out into the untamed borderlands between Canada and the United States to escape a dark secret from his past. He settles in Montana where he hopes to buy a cattle ranch, and where he begins work as a liaison between the American and Canadian militaries in an effort to contain the Native Americans’ unresolved anger in the wake of the Civil War. Amid the brutal violence that erupts between the Sioux warriors and U.S. forces, Case’s plan for a quiet ranch life is further compromised by an unexpected dilemma: he falls in love with the beautiful, outspoken, and recently widowed Ada Tarr. It’s a budding romance that soon inflames the jealousy of Ada’s quiet and deeply disturbed admirer, Michael Dunne. When the American government unleashes its final assault on the Indians, Dunne commences his own vicious plan for vengeance in one last feverish attempt to claim Ada as his own.

Vanderhaeghe expertly weaves a gritty account of the end of the Wild West with an intimate tale of love, retribution, and rebirth. Beautifully imagined and deeply moving, A Good Man is Vanderhaeghe’s triumphant conclusion to his venerated turn-of-the-century epic.



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The Wonder House
by Justine Hardy

“Rich with sensual detail, making for vivid impressions.” —Publishers Weekly

Justine Hardy is an English journalist, a best-selling author, and a filmmaker who has spent much of the past fifteen years living in India. With her American debut, The Wonder House, Hardy has crafted an unforgettable love story set set in the turbulent region of Kashmir, one of the most beautiful and broken places in the world. On Nagin Lake sits moored a houseboat called The Wonder House, on which Englishwoman, Gracie Singh, has been living out her widowhood since the death of her Indian husband. From The Wonder House Gracie has watched the valley become brutally disfigured by Pakistan and India’s drawn-out clash over this coveted territory—just as she has watched her best friend and landlord, Masood Abdullah, change from a jeans-wearing, flirtatious young man to an anxious father hemmed in by growing Islamic orthodoxy. Soon after Masood’s nephew disappears to join an extremist militant group, Hal, a journalist from England, comes to interview Gracie, putting them all in grave danger. Told by and about a Western woman’s immersion in the endlessly alluring and troubled Islamic culture of North India, Justine Hardy’s gorgeous and gritty novel about human passions in a battered valley is a vital addition to the literature about India.


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Zabelle
A Novel
by Nancy Kricorian

Zabelle begins in a suburb of Boston with the quiet death of Zabelle Chahasbanian, an elderly widow and grandmother whose history remains vastly unknown to her family. But as the story shifts back in time to Zabelle’s childhood in the waning days of Ottoman Turkey, where she survives the 1915 Armenian genocide and near starvation in the Syrian desert, an unforgettable character begins to emerge. Zabelle’s journey encompasses years in an Istanbul orphanage, a fortuitous adoption by a rich Armenian family, and an arranged marriage to an Armenian grocer who brings her to America where the often comic interactions and battles she wages are forever colored by shadows from the long-lost world of her past.


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Perlmann's Silence
by Pascal Mercier
A tremendous international success and a huge favorite with booksellers and critics, Pascal Mercier’s Night Train to Lisbon is one of the bestselling literary European novels in recent years. Now, in Perlmann’s Silence, the follow-up to his triumphant North American debut, Pascal Mercier delivers a deft psychological portrait of a man striving to get his life back on track in the wake of his beloved wife’s death.

Philipp Perlmann, prominent linguist and speaker at a gathering of renowned international academics in a picturesque seaside town near Genoa, is struggling to maintain his grip on reality. Derailed by grief and no longer confident of his professional standing, writing his keynote address seems like an insurmountable task and, as the deadline approaches, Perlmann realizes that he will have nothing to present to his expectant colleagues. Terrorstricken, he decides to plagiarize the work of Leskov, a Russian colleague, and breathes a sigh of short-lived relief once the text has been submitted. But when Leskov’s imminent arrival is announced and threatens to expose Perlmann as a fraud, Perlmann’s mounting desperation leads him to contemplate drastic measures.

An exquisite, captivating portrait of a mind slowly unraveling, Perlmann’s Silence is a brilliant, textured meditation on the complex interplay between language and memory, and the depths of the human psyche.



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The Bird Skinner
by Alice Greenway
Winner of the Los Angeles Times Award for First Fiction, Alice Greenway’s second novel is a lush and evocative story of war, love, aging, and birds.

Slowing down from a hard-lived life and a recent leg amputation, ornithologist Jim Kennoway retreats to an island in Maine: to drink, smoke, and be left alone. There, he thinks back to his youth, working for Naval Intelligence during World War II in the Solomon Islands. While spying on Japanese shipping from behind enemy lines, Jim befriended Tosca, a young islander who worked with him as a scout. Now, thirty years later, Tosca has sent his daughter Cadillac to stay with Jim in the weeks before she begins premedical studies at Yale. She arrives to Jim’s consternation—yet she will capture his heart and that of everyone she meets, irrevocably changing their lives.


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Salty
A Novel
by Mark Haskell Smith

From the author of Moist and Delicious comes a raucous comic thriller. Turk Henry, an overweight, unemployed rock star, has discovered that Thailand is probably the last place a recovering sex addict should go on vacation. Yet here he is, surrounded by topless groupies and haunted by hundreds of luscious bar girls. Turk’s struggles with monogamy, however, pale beside a greater challenge when his supermodel wife is abducted by a group of shipless Thai pirates. As Turk, his life skills limited to playing bass and partying, navigates back alleys and deadly jungles to save his wife, Salty heats up and sweats bullets. Featuring skinflint American tourists, a hypochondriac U.S. government agent, suitcases loaded with cash, an overeager full-service personal assistant, a horny Australian commando, inventive prostitutes, and an urbane pirate with a fetish for alabaster skin, this is a hilariously entertaining, thoroughly debauched caper novel—with a happy finish.


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A Spell of Winter
by Helen Dunmore

The inaugural winner of England’s prestigious Orange Prize, A Spell of Winter is a compelling turn-of-the-century tale of innocence corrupted by secrecy, and the grace of second chances. Cathy and her brother, Rob, have forged a passionate refuge against the terror of loneliness and family secrets, but their sibling love becomes fraught with danger. As Catherine fights free of her dark present and haunting past, the spell of winter that has held her in its grasp begins to break.


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A Girl Could Stand Up
by Leslie Marshall
Surprising and wise, A Girl Could Stand Up is a novel bristling with charm. The beating heart of this novel is the love story that develops between Elray and her friend Raoul. Their secret adventures take them from the crypts of the Washington Cathedral, where they first bump into each other on the third subterranean level, to a life-threatening swim in the waters of the Potomac River in their search for invincibility.  Reminiscent of John Irving’s Hotel New Hampshire, A Girl Could Stand Up is compulsively readable and ultimately uplifting. It is a testament to a new idea of family in its imperfect but shining state.

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Heart of Palm
by Laura Lee Smith
Arla Bolton had been warned never to marry a Bravo. From the country-club set in genteel St. Augustine, Florida, Arla gave it all up to marry Dean Bravo and move to Utina, best known for the trade in Palm Sunday palms and moonshine. Opportunity has passed by both Utina and the Bravos for decades, but Arla was young and in love and blind to how her choice would change her life. Now Dean is gone and she shares a ramshackle waterfront house with her willful daughter, Sofia, nursing her losses and wondering if Dean’s doing the same wherever he is. Frank, her dutiful middle son, manages the family restaurant without complaint, while he dreams of escaping the Florida heat to cool mountain rivers, and dreams of his brother Carson’s wife, Elizabeth, whom he’s loved since adolescence.

In short, the Bravos are due a break—and when the phone rings one fourth of July, it seems a developer wants to bring progress to Utina at last, provided the Bravos agree. But are they ready? Ready or not, it seems the phone call has set off a chain reaction. Two surprise arrivals, one late-blooming love story, one hedge fund scam, a truck full of melted Key lime pies, and a bittersweet reckoning or two later, Heart of Palm reveals what happens when opportunity knocks, tempers ignite, and long-buried secrets are unearthed.





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A Girl Made of Dust
by Nathalie Abi-Ezzi
A Girl Made of Dust is a sophisticated exploration of one family’s private battle to survive in the midst of civil war.
          In her peaceful town outside Beirut, Ruba is slowly awakening to the shifting contours within her household: hardly speaking and refusing to work, her father has inexplicably withdrawn from his family; her once-youthful mother looks so sad that Ruba imagines her heart must have withered like a fig in the heat; and Ruba’s older brother has begun to secretly meet with older boys who carry guns. When Ruba decides that to salvage her family she must first save her father, she uncovers a long-buried secret that will send her on a journey away from the safety of childhood and into a brutal reality where men kill in the name of faith and race, past wrongs remain unforgiven, and where nothing less than courageous acts of sacrifice and unity can offer survival.
          A Girl Made of Dust is a coming-of-age story sparked, but not consumed, by violence and loss. This strikingly assured debut captures both a country and a childhood plagued by a conflict that even at its darkest and most threatening, carries the promise of healing and retribution.


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Kornwolf
A Novel
by Tristan Egolf
Tristan Egolf's new novel is a book about the return of an old curse—the Kornwolf, a ferocious werewolf whose nocturnal rampaging becomes increasingly impossible to ignore. Kornwolf takes the reader for a good old-fashioned romp in the stubble—a journey through the slums and honky tundra of rural Pennsylvania, where nothing quite passes for good or bad, sublime or dismal, discrete or brash. And then the monotony breaks. Something—a freak of creation—is running amok in the fields. To solve the mystery, three generations of prodigal sons—a writer and hometown boy who swore he'd never come back to Penn's Woods; a middle-aged former pugilist who runs a decrepit boxing gym; and a misfit, mute, beaten-down Amish boy—are brought together by the light of a blue moon, in a town called Blue Ball. On one level this is a masterfully orchestrated, hilarious, and compelling take on the classic horror yarn, on another, Kornwolf is a social satire of suburban sprawl, closed minds, and all manners and varieties of self-satisfaction—Amish, civilian, or... other—in the best tradition of Tom Robbins and George Saunders.

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Hide & Seek
A Novel
by Clare Sambrook
Meet Harry Pickles, the fastest boy in the world (well, at least in school), big brother to Daniel (who runs like a girl but is, in his own twerpy way, a star), and the firstborn son of Mo and Pa, the best-looking parents in their Notting Hill elementary school parking lot. Harry’s life, like any other nine-year-old’s, is a colorful, frenetic, and fun blur of lunch boxes, vocabulary tests, and keeping up with his pals Piggy and Terry—not to mention keeping an eye on his kid brother Daniel. Mo, a successful, well-known journalist, and Pa, a surgeon, have built a wonderful world for Harry and Daniel to grow up in, but when a school outing results in Daniel’s vanishing, the complicated adult world of police investigations and interviews, searches of the countryside, recriminations, and ultimate responsibility comes crashing in on a very confused Harry. Told with an utterly compelling and exuberant sense of truth, Hide & Seek is a fresh debut of tense mystery, disarming humor, and remarkable compassion. Clare Sambrook’s novel should find its place alongside other recent achievements in literary fiction such as The Lovely Bones and The Deep End of the Ocean.

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Playing
A Novel
by Melanie Abrams

Melanie Abrams’s debut novel is a provocative tale about love, betrayal, and how one young woman’s unconventional sexual reawakening uncovers the most guarded parts of her past.
When Josie, an anthropology grad student, is unexpectedly offered a job as the nanny for six-year-old Tyler, she innocently accepts. Though Josie doesn’t necessarily need the job, there’s something about Tyler’s single mom, Mary—her beauty, her confidence, her resemblance to Josie’s mother—that draws Josie in. While her quick intimacy with Mary soothes Josie’s estrangement from her own parents, it also breeds betrayal when Josie falls for Mary’s crush, Devesh. An Indian surgeon ten years Josie’s senior, Devesh is a strong and enigmatic man who pulls Josie into a dizzying world of sexual domination and submission that speaks to her deeply hidden desires. It is a world of games that fast becomes serious, forcing Josie to confront the darkest moments of her past as she desperately struggles with her family history, her own violent impulses, and her love for Devesh.
Rapturous, illuminating, and emotionally charged, Playing is an unflinching look at the irrevocable consequences of giving in to our most secret passions, and the freedom and imprisonment that comes with true self-knowledge.


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I'll Steal You Away
by Niccolò Ammaniti
Italian literary superstar Niccolò Ammaniti’s debut novel, I’m Not Scared, prompted gushing praise, hit international best-seller lists, and was made into a smash indie film. With his highly anticipated follow-up, Ammaniti takes his unparalleled empathy for children, his scythe-sharp observations, and his knack for building tension to a whole new level. In a tiny Italian village, a young boy named Pietro is growing up tormented by bullies and ignored by his parents. When an aging playboy, Graziano Biglia, returns to town, a change is in the air:  Pietro decides to take on the bullies, his lonely teacher Flora finds romance with the town’s prodigal son, and the inept janitor at the school proclaims his love for his favorite prostitute. But the village isn’t ready for such change, and when Graziano seduces and forgets Flora, both she and Pietro’s tentative hopes seem crushed forever. With great tenderness, Ammaniti shines light on the heart-wrenching failures and quiet redemptions of ordinary people trying to live extraordinary lives. I’ll Steal You Away is a fresh and classic story of a boy learning to be a man that delivers on the promise of Ammaniti’s acclaimed debut.

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Curfew
by Jose Donoso
“José Donoso, Chile’s greatest living writer, has been able to provide the first original reflection on contemporary Chile to appear in its literature. Curfew is the nearest approximation to a cultural event of believable content to have come into being since Pinochet took power. Donoso lifts the veil woven by the heroes and the villains, the martyrs and the murderers, to expose the hidden life of Chileans. He reveals that even those who fight against the dictatorship may be cowards and antiheroes. Most important of all, he shows that not everything in Chile is clear—there is also confusion and despair. . . . [Mañungo is] the first hero/antihero with whom all the Chileans under Pinochet can identify as they seek a place to survive. It is a relief to read a work of Chilean literature in which none of the characters are above history or appear to dominate it. No individual act of political protest is more telling than the sad lives that Chileans are forced to lead.”—Jacob Timerman, in The New Yorker

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Wavemaker II
by Mary-Beth Hughes

“The most important and surprising first novel I’ve read in years, full of subtlety and compassion and paradoxical empathy for a world-class scoundrel. Hughes’s elegant provocations get into you like a virus, and their traces kick around for a long time after.”—Rick Moody

It is 1964, McCarthy has failed in his scare tactics, and the fallout of his actions continues as his chief counsel, Roy Cohn is under investigation. Will Clemens throws his family into turmoil when he refuses to testify against his friend Roy Cohn. We enter the splintering world of the Clemens family through the points of view of each family member: Kay as she tries to shore up her deteriorating family; young Bo as he battles cancer; adolescent Lou-Lou, who aches for her mother’s lost attention; and Will, whose tired strength carries him through prison life. Finally, there is the surprisingly empathetic Roy Cohn, who has become the family’s shadowy protector in gratitude for Will’s loyalty. Combining poetic intensity with a gritty realism, Mary-Beth Hughes has delivered a masterpiece of page-turning suspense.


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February
by Lisa Moore
February is Lisa Moore’s heart-stopping follow-up to her debut novel, Alligator, winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for the Caribbean and Canadian region. Propelled by a local tragedy, in which an oil rig sinks in a violent storm off the coast of Newfoundland, February follows the life of Helen O’Mara, widowed by the accident, as she continuously spirals from the present day back to that devastating and transformative winter. After overcoming the hardships of raising four children as a single parent, Helen’s strength and calculated positivity fool everyone into believing that she’s pushed through the paralyzing grief of losing her spouse. But in private, Helen has obsessively maintained a powerful connection to her deceased husband. When Helen’s son unexpectedly returns home with life-changing news, her secret world is irrevocably shaken, and Helen is quickly forced to come to terms with her inability to lay the past to rest. An unforgettable glimpse into the complex love and cauterizing grief that run through all of our lives, February tenderly investigates how memory knits together the past and present, and pinpoints the very human need to always imagine a future, no matter how fragile.

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The Blindness of the Heart
A Novel
by Julia Franck
Winner of the German Book Prize, The Blindness of the Heart is a dark marvel of a novel by one of Europe’s freshest young voices—a family story spanning two world wars and several generations in a German family. In the devastating opening scene, a woman named Helene stands with her seven-year-old son in a provincial German railway station in 1945, amid the chaos of civilians fleeing west. Having survived with him through the horror and deprivation of the war years, she abandons him on the station platform and never returns. The story quickly circles back to Helene’s childhood with her sister Martha in rural Germany, which came to an abrupt end with the outbreak of the First World War. Julia Franck’s unforgettable English language debut throws new light on life in early-twentieth-century Germany, revealing the breathtaking scope of its citizens’ denial—the “blindness of the heart” that survival often demanded. The reader, however, brings his or her own historical perspective to bear on the events unfolding, and the result is a disturbing and compulsive reading experience about a country ravaged from the inside out.

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It's Not Love, It's Just Paris
by Patricia Engel
Patricia Engel’s story collection, Vida, established her as one of this country’s best young writers, winning praise from Junot Díaz, Uzodinma Iweala, Francisco Goldman, and others. Her first novel is a vibrant, wistful narrative about an American girl in Paris, who navigates the intoxicating and treacherous complexities of independence, friendship, and romance.

Lita del Cielo, the daughter of two Colombian orphans who arrived in America with nothing and made a fortune with their Latin food empire, has been granted one year to pursue her studies in Paris before she must return to work in the family business. She moves into a gently crumbling Left Bank mansion known as “The House of Stars,” where a spirited but bedridden Countess Séraphine rents out rooms to young women visiting Paris to work, study, and, unofficially, to find love.

Cautious and guarded, Lita keeps a cool distance from the other girls, who seem at once boldly adult and impulsively naïve, who both intimidate and fascinate her. Then Lita meets Cato, and the contours of her world shift. Charming, enigmatic, and weak with illness, Cato is the son of a notorious right-wing politician. As Cato and Lita retreat to their own world, they soon find it difficult to keep the outside world from closing in on theirs. Ultimately Lita must decide whether to stay in France with Cato or return home to fulfill her immigrant family’s dreams for her future.

It’s Not Love, It’s Just Paris is a spellbinding love story, a portrait of a Paris caught between old world grandeur and the international greenblood elite, and an exploration of one woman’s journey to distinguish honesty from artifice and lay claim to her own life.



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Sons and Other Flammable Objects
A Novel
by Porochista Khakpour

Compared by Danzy Senna to "the young Philip Roth" for her "lashing, dark humor tinged with deep melancholy," Porochista Khakpour is one of her generation's most outrageously gifted new talents. Sons and Other Flammable Objects is at once a comedy and a tragedy, a family history, and a modern coming-of-age story with a distinctly timeless resonance.
Growing up, Xerxes Adam is painfully aware that he is different—with an understanding of his Iranian heritage that vacillates from typical teenage embarrassment to something so tragic it can barely be spoken. His father, Darius, obsesses over his sense of exile, and fantasizes about a nonexistent daughter he can relate to better than his living son; Xerxes' mother changes her name and tries to make friends; but neither of them can help their son make sense of the terrifying, violent last moments in a homeland he barely remembers. As he grows into manhood and moves to New York, his major goal in life is to completely separate from his parents, but when he meets a beautiful half-Iranian girl on the roof of his building after New York's own terrifying and violent catastrophe strikes, it seems Iran will not let Xerxes go.


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The Earth Hums in B Flat
by Mari Strachan

The Earth Hums in B Flat is a story of dark family secrets unraveled by the shrewd insight of twelve-year-old Gwenni Morgan, a child with an irrepressible spirit living in a Welsh village that is reluctantly entering the modern age. From the small bed that she shares with her sister at night she flies up into the starry sky above her village and looks down on the lives of its inhabitants. And when the family that she babysits for is rocked by the sudden, unexplainable disappearance of their patriarch, Gwenni is determined to solve the mystery of Ifan Evan’s whereabouts. Turning amateur detective, she is unaware that the trail will lead her closer to home than she ever imagined.
Told with a breathtaking, irresistible blend of freshness and wisdom, the voice that sixty-two-year-old Welsh debut novelist Mari Strachan has created with Gwenni is vibrant, charming, and full of heart. An unforgettable character, Gwenni’s unique way of seeing the world lends her the ability to make the ordinary extraordinary. A magical novel about the trials of youth, familial duty, and understanding, The Earth Hums in B Flat will transport you to another time and place.



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The Summer of the Bear
A Novel
by Bella Pollen
Best-selling author Bella Pollen’s imaginative new novel received stellar reviews in hardcover and was chosen as a Richard & Judy Book Club title. 

In 1980 Germany, Cold War tensions are once again escalating and a mole is suspected in the British Embassy. So when the clever diplomat Nicky Fleming dies suddenly and suspiciously, it’s convenient to brand him the traitor. But was his death an accident, murder, or suicide? As the government investigates Nicky's death, his wife relocates with their three children to a remote Scottish island hoping to save what remains of their family. But the isolated shores of her childhood retreat only intensify their distance between them, and it is the brilliant and peculiar youngest child, Jamie, who alone holds on to the one thing he’s sure of: his father has promised to return and he was a man who never broke a promise.

When Jamie sets off to explore the island with his teenage sisters, they discover a tamed grizzly bear has been marooned on shore, hiding somewhere among the seaside caves. Jamie believes the bear may have a strange connection to his father, and as he seeks the truth, Nicky's story begins revealing itself in unexpected ways.


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The Beastly Beatitudes of Balthazar B
by J.P. Donleavy
Balthazar B is the world’s last shy, elegant young man. Born to riches in Paris, and raised by a governess, the beautiful Miss Hortense, Balthazar is shipped away to prep school in England where he is befriended by the noble but naughty Beefy. Together, Balthazar and Beefy matriculate to Trinity College, Dublin, where Balthazar reads Zoology and Beefy prepares for Holy Orders, all the while sharing amorous adventures high and low until their university careers come to an abrupt and decidedly unholy end.
“Revelatory and delightful and sometimes very poignant,” The New York Times said of this novel. “The prep school passages are wonderful, followed by one of the most perfect love affairs in modern literature. This romp of a novel is lush and lovely, bawdy and sad.”


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The Loved Ones
by Mary-Beth Hughes
The nationally bestselling Hughes returns with a darkly brilliant Mad Men–esque drama of family secrets and professional lies reminiscent of Richard Yates’s Revolutionary Road and James Salter’s Light Years.

From the outside in, the Devlin family lead almost-perfect lives. Dashing father, Nick, is a successful businessman long married to sweetheart Jean, who upholds the family home and throws dinner parties while daughter Lily attends Catholic school and is disciplined into modesty by the nuns. Under the surface, however, the Devlins are silently broken by the death of their little boy. As Nick’s older brother, a man driven by callous and rapacious urges, inducts Nick into the cut-throat world of cosmetics, the Devlin family are further fragmented by betrayals, and victims of the cruelest kind of hurt.

In The Loved Ones Hughes takes her gimlet eye deep into the secret places between men and women to give an incisive portrayal of one family’s struggle to stay together against stacked odds of deception, adultery, and loss. Years in the making, this is Hughes’s astonishing and compulsively readable break out, a sweepingly cinematic novel of relationships defined by an era of glamour and decadence.



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Logic
A Novel
by Olympia Vernon

Olympia Vernon’s fearless and wildly original debut novel, Eden, was hailed by critics.  In her second novel, Logic, Vernon returns to the Deep South to conjure up a breathtaking and tremendously powerful story of a young girl’s struggle to free herself from the unspeakable condition she refers to as “the butterflies floating inside” her. Thirteen-year-old Logic Harris almost died when she fell from a tree as a young girl. Since rescuing Logic that day, her mother, Too, has secretly wished Logic had not survived the accident, and now ignores the increasingly apparent evidence of the aberrant attention Logic’s father bestows upon his daughter. As Too retreats to the Missis’ house down the street where she works as a domestic, Logic’s father withdraws further into paranoia, and Logic is left to navigate alone what she scarcely understands. Logic is populated with characters both strange and unmistakably real, all of them drawn with exquisite intensity. In inspired prose, stunning in its imaginative authority, Logic is a chilling allegory about the dangers of silence and a searing portrait of a girl lost in shame and fear, and a family and community too scarred by their own wounds to save her.


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Assassins of the Turquoise Palace
by Roya Hakakian
On the evening of September 17, 1992, eight leading members of the Iranian and Kurdish opposition had gathered at a little-known restaurant in Berlin when two darkly clad men burst through the entrance. Within moments the roar of a machine gun filled the air. Two rounds of fire and four single shots later, four of the men were dead.

Who had pulled the trigger? The morning papers implicated the Iraqi president, Saddam Hussein. The chief federal prosecutor suspected a rival opposition group. But neither the press nor the country’s top lawman knew then that these men were not the only ones who had been killed. Since the rise to power of Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979, over one hundred Iranian exiles had disappeared or been assassinated in Europe and elsewhere.

But one of the survivors of that shooting, along with the widow of one of the victims and a handful of reporters, attorneys, and fellow exiles, began a crusade that would not only pit themselves against Tehran but against some of the greatest powers in Germany. An undeterred federal prosecutor and an endlessly patient chief judge took over the case and a historic verdict followed that shook both Europe and Iran, and achieved something few could have predicted—justice.

Assassins of the Turquoise Palace is the first book to tell this story in all its detail, from the ghastly shooting inside Mykonos restaurant to the investigation that took place over the course of several years, and finally to the landmark trial—a case that marked the first and only time that a non-democratic regime had been put on trial for its blatant violation of international law, and which to this day remains the only instance of Western success against Iran’s ruling clerics. Roya Hakakian’s Assassins of the Turquoise Palace is an incredible book of history and reportage, and an unforgettable narrative of heroism and justice.



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Dominion
A Novel
by Calvin Baker

With Calvin Baker’s first novel, Naming The New World, he was named a “Notable First Novelist” by Time magazine. Since his second novel, Once Two Heroes, Baker has continued to be acclaimed by the major media from the Los Angeles Times to Esquire. Now, with Dominion, Baker has written a lush, incantatory novel about three generations of an African American family in the years leading up to the Revolutionary War. Dominion tells the story of the Merian family who, at the close of the seventeenth century, settle in the wilderness of the Carolinas. Jasper is the patriarch, freed from bondage, who manages against all odds to build a thriving estate with his new wife and two sons—one enslaved, the other free. For one hundred years, the Merian family struggles against the natural (and occasionally supernatural) world, colonial politics, the injustices of slavery, the Revolutionary War and questions of fidelity and the heart. Footed in both myth and modernity, Calvin Baker crafts a rich, intricate and moving novel, with meditations on God, responsibility, and familial legacies. While masterfully incorporating elements of the world’s oldest and greatest stories, the end result is a bold contemplation of the origins of America.


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The Pleasure of Eliza Lynch
by Anne Enright


Internationally acclaimed writer Anne Enright delivers an astonishing, rich tour de force based on the life of a woman truly larger than life: Eliza Lynch, the nineteenth-century Irishwoman who became Paraguay's Eva Perón. Beautiful, sophisticated, and adventurous, Eliza met Francisco Solano López in Paris when she was nineteen. In less than a decade, López became dictator, plunging Paraguay into a violent conflict, while Eliza became notorious—as both the angel of the battlefield, inspiring the troops, and the demon driving López's ambition. Enright's gorgeous, deeply resonant novel about this extraordinary woman follows the arc of a life from the joyous sting of meeting López, to burying him alone in a Paraguayan Golgotha.


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The Flowers
by Dagoberto Gilb

Sonny Bravo is a tender, unusually smart fifteen-year-old who is living with his vivacious mother in a large city where intense prejudice is not just white against black, but also brown. When Sonny’s mother, Silvia, suddenly marries an Okie building contractor named Cloyd Longpre, they are uprooted to a small apartment building, Los Flores. As Sonny sweeps its sidewalks, he meets his neighbors and becomes ensnared in their lives: Cindy, an eighteen-year-old druggie who is married and bored; Nica, a cloistered Mexican girl who cares for her infant brother but who is never allowed to leave their unit. The other tenants range from Pink, an albino black man who sells old cars in front of the building, to Bud, a muscled-up construction worker who hates blacks and Mexicans, even while he’s married to a Mexican-American woman. Dagoberto Gilb, in arguably his most powerful work yet, has written an inspiring novel about hate, pain, anger, and love that transcends age, race, and time. Gilb’s novel displays the fearlessness and wit that have helped make him one of this country’s most authentic and original voices.


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Misconception
by Ryan Boudinot

Cedar Rivers is on a strange errand. A doctor sidelined into the strange world of the first dot-com boom, he has come to Albany, New York, in between business in Iceland and home in Silicon Valley, to meet a woman he hasn’t seen in twenty years. Then a Chuck Taylor–shod proto-Goth with chipped black nail polish, Kat is now a literary up-and-comer who needs Cedar to vet her memoir—an account of the summer they were sweethearts. As if that weren’t enough, she’s written parts of it from his point of view. Through an intense weekend in a snowed-in motel room, Cedar and Kat relive their most painful memories: Before they had a chance at first love, Kat’s mother and her new fiancé dragged Kat off on a family trip. Kat returned with a secret, one which—when she shared it with Cedar—set off a series of drastically miscalculated assumptions that dominoed into a moment of startling tragedy. Misconception is a startlingly original debut novel—a smart and provocative coming-of-age story, and a fresh and witty comment on the unreliability of memory and storytelling—that establishes Ryan Boudinot as one of the most promising talents of his generation.


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One in Three
A Son's Journey into the History and Science of Cancer
by Adam Wishart

Writer and documentary director Adam Wishart’s poignant and timely book on cancer is the first of its kind—a seamless blend of memoir and medical history that simultaneously explains science in an elegant, non-intimidating way and connects to the experience of being a patient. When his father was diagnosed with cancer, Wishart couldn’t find a book that answered his most basic questions: What was the disease and how did it take hold? What is it about cancer’s biology that makes it hard to eradicate? Are we to a cure?  One in Three is a son’s personal and journalistic take on cancer’s history and the encouraging story of science’s progress in changing the outlook on cancer from a disease we die from to one we live with, providing the full account of the discovery of the disease, its treatment, and its prevention. Wishart’s candid discussion of his personal link to cancer is ultimately a story of hope, and one in which we may all find comfort. One in three of us will develop cancer. This book will help us to understand it without fear.


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Happy Family
A Novel
by Wendy Lee

When Hua Wu arrives in New York City, her life seems destined to resemble that of countless immigrants before her. She spends her hectic days in a restaurant in Chinatown, and her lonesome nights in a noisy, crowded tenement, yearning for those she left behind. But one day in a park in the West Village, Hua meets Jane Templeton and her daughter, Lily, a two-year-old adopted from China. Eager to expose Lily to the language and culture of her birth country, Jane hires Hua to be her nanny.
Hua soon finds herself in a world far removed from the cramped streets of Chinatown or her grandmother’s home in Fuzhou, China. Jane, a museum curator of Asian art, and her husband, a theater critic, are cultured and successful. They pull Hua into their circle of family and friends until she is deeply attached to Lily and their way of life. But when cracks show in the family’s perfect façade, what will Hua do to protect the little girl who reminds her so much of her own past? A beautiful and revelatory novel, Happy Family is the promising debut of a perceptive and graceful writer.


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Sarah Thornhill
by Kate Grenville
In the final book of a trilogy that began with her bestselling novel, The Secret River, Commonwealth Prize–winner Kate Grenville returns to the youngest daughter of the Thornhills and her quest to uncover, at her peril, the family’s hidden legacy.

Sarah is the youngest child of William Thornhill, the pioneer at the center of The Secret River. Unknown to her, her father—an uneducated ex-convict from London—has built his fortune on the blood of Aboriginal people. With a fine stone house and plenty of money, Thornhill has re-invented himself. As he tells his daughter, he “never looks back,” and Sarah grows up learning not to ask about the past. Instead her eyes are on handsome Jack Langland, whom she’s loved since she was a child. Their romance seems destined, but the ugly secret in Sarah’s family is poised to ambush them both. 

As she did with The Secret River, Grenville once again digs into her own family history to tell a story about the past that still resonates today. Driven by the captivating voice of the illiterate Sarah—at once headstrong, sympathetic, curious, and refreshingly honest—this is an unforgettable portrait of a passionate woman caught up in a historical moment of astonishing turmoil.


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Lyrics Alley
A Novel
by Leila Aboulela
Winner of the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust Book Award for Fiction and short-listed for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (South Asia and Europe), Lyrics Alley is the evocative story of an affluent Sudanese family shaken by the startling shifts in their country’s politics and their family’s legacy.

In 1950’s Sudan, Mahmoud Abuzeid has amassed a fortune through his trading firm. But when his son, Nur, the brilliant, handsome heir to his business empire, suffers a debilitating accident, the family is suddenly confronted with an uncertain future. As British rule nears its end, the country is torn between modernizing influences and the call of traditions past—a conflict reflected in the growing tensions between Mahmoud’s two wives: Nabilah, who longs to return to Egypt and escape “backward-looking” Sudan, while Waheeba lives traditionally, confined to her open-air kitchen. It’s not until Nur asserts himself outside his parents’ cultural limits that the frayed bonds of his family begin to mend.

Hailed by Library Journal as Aboulela’s “breakthrough novel,” Lyrics Alley is one of the most accomplished portraits ever written about Sudanese society at the time of independence.



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August Frost
A Novel
by Monique Roffey
A sparkling first novel is a story of transformation and self-discovery from a writer of tremendous originality and maturity. August is a tall, pale, painfully shy young man with blood-orange hair and sun-shy eyes who hides his awkwardness working behind the counter of the gourmet deli in London's Shepherd's Bush neighborhood. One winter day he finds a rash on his arm that resembles the crystalline frost on his windowpane. Later, snow begins to fall around his head, and his fingers turn blue. Is it some rare disease, or the sudden appearance of his mother's former lover, Cosmo? Could it be an allergy to the deli's new orange cheese, which seems to mock his own coloring? As Cosmo taunts him about the identity of his father, August's body changes with the seasons. Mingling lyrical depth and subtle wisdom, August Frost will resonate in readers' hearts long after the last page is turned.

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Jam on the Vine
by LaShonda Barnett
Jam! On the Vine is a new American classic: a dynamic tale of triumph against the odds and the compelling story of one woman’s struggle for equality that belongs alongside Jazz by Toni Morrison and The Color Purple by Alice Walker.

Ivoe Williams, the precocious daughter of a Muslim cook and a metalsmith from central-east Texas, first ignites her lifelong obsession with journalism when she steals a newspaper from her mother’s white employer. Living in the poor, segregated quarter of Little Tunis, Ivoe immerses herself in printed matter as an escape from her dour surroundings. She earns a scholarship to the prestigious Willetson College in Austin, only to return overqualified to the menial labor offered by her hometown’s racially biased employers.

Ivoe eventually flees the Jim Crow South with her family and settles in Kansas City, where she and her former teacher and lover, Ona, found the first female-run African American newspaper, Jam! On the Vine. In the throes of the Red Summer—the 1919 outbreak of lynchings and race riots across the Midwest—Ivoe risks her freedom and her life to call attention to the atrocities of segregation in the American prison system.

Skillfully interweaving Ivoe’s story with those of her family members, LaShonda Katrice Barnett’s Jam! On the Vine is both an epic vision of the hardships and injustices that defined an era and a moving and compelling story of a complicated history we only thought we knew.



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The Honeymoon
by Justin Haythe

In his debut novel, The Honeymoon, Haythe delivers a deeply observant and nuanced tale, set in London and Venice at the end of the twentieth century, in which a young man looks back on a series of events that have caused his life to unravel.  Until the age of twenty-one, American-born Gordon Garrety hasn’t reflected much on his unusual and peripatetic childhood, spent largely as the traveling companion of his eccentric mother, Maureen. Only when Gordon meets Annie, several years his senior, does he begin to emerge from the sphere of his mother’s influence. The first time they meet, Gordon and Annie make love in a park and soon after are married.  Over the course of a year in London, Gordon and Annie construct for themselves an idea of married life, into which Maureen’s restless spirit occasionally intrudes. Accompanied by Maureen and her bibulous Swiss fiancé, Gerhardt, Annie and Gordon finally take their long-delayed honeymoon to Venice, where they are instantly seduced by the world’s most unlikely city.  Beautifully crafted, gently funny, and genuinely surprising, Justin Haythe’s remarkably assured debut will astound readers with its dead-on depiction of the dangers of desultory and privileged lives.


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Dark Roots
Stories
by Cate Kennedy
A collection of prize-winning stories by The New Yorker–debuted Australian that is “by turns funny, wise, and achingly sad” (Stephanie Bishop, Sydney Morning Herald). Australian Cate Kennedy delivers a mesmerizing story collection that travels to the deepest depths of the human psyche. In these sublimely sophisticated and compulsively readable tales, Kennedy opens up worlds of finely observed detail to explore the collision between simmering inner lives and the cold outside world. Her stories are populated by people on the brink: a woman floundering with her own loss and emotional immobility as her lover lies in a coma; a neglected wife who cannot convince her husband of the truth about his two shamelessly libidinous friends; or a married woman realizes that her too-tight wedding ring isn’t the only thing that’s stuck in her relationship. Each character must make a choice and none is without consequence—even the smallest decisions have the power to destroy or renew, to recover and relinquish. Devastating, evocative, and richly comic, Dark Roots deftly unveils the traumas that incite us to desperate measures and the coincidences that drive our lives. This arresting collection introduces a new master of the short story.

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Requiem
by Frances Itani
An extraordinary researcher and scholar of detail, Frances Itani—author of the best-selling novel Deafening—excels at weaving breathtaking fiction from true-life events. In her new novel, she traces the lives, loves, and secrets in one Japanese-Canadian family during and after their internment in the 1940s.

In 1942, in retaliation for the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Canadian government removed Bin Okuma’s family from their home on British Columbia’s west coast and forced them into internment camps. They were allowed to take only the possessions they could carry, and Bin, as a young boy, was forced to watch neighbors raid his family’s home before the transport boats even undocked. One hundred miles from the “Protected Zone,” they had to form new makeshift communities without direct access to electricity, plumbing, or food—for five years.

Fifty years later, after his wife’s sudden death, Bin travels across Canada to find the biological father who has been lost to him. Both running from grief and driving straight toward it, Bin must ask himself whether he truly wants to find First Father, the man who made a fateful decision that almost destroyed his family all those years ago. With his wife’s persuasive voice in his head and the echo of their love in his heart, Bin embarks on an unforgettable journey into his past that will throw light on a dark time in history.


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The Voices
by Susan Elderkin

“Vividly imagined. . . . Much of [The Voices] is narrated by the voices, who speak in a royal we. . . . It’s a daring move, but it works entirely.”—Time Out New York

A story of incantatory beauty set in the wilds of Australia, Susan Elderkin’s second novel The Voices has earned her the distinction from Granta as one of the Best Young British Writers Under 40.  In the remote, bloodred dust of the Australian bush thirteen-year-old Billy Saint turns to the stark landscape and mesmerizing spirits of the native Aborigines for the companionship he lacks at home. When he is befriended by Maisie, an enigmatic Aboriginal girl who has “sung him up,” he slowly comes to realize that he is meddling with powers far beyond his control. Ten years later, Billy lies in a hospital bed, recovering from gruesome wounds of mysterious origin. Shifting between his hospital stay and the childhood that led him there, The Voices unfolds into a haunting exploration of the relationship between a white man, the land he loves, and the native spirits of the country struggling to be heard before they are lost forever.


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The Circle of Hanh
A Memoir
by Bruce Weigl
In this piercingly honest memoir, Bruce Weigl, who has established himself as one of our finest American poets, explores the central experience of his life as a writer and a man: the Vietnam War, which tore his life apart and in return gave him his poetic voice. Weigl knew nothing about Vietnam before enlisting in 1967, but he saw a free ride out of a difficult childhood among volatile people. The war completely changed his life; there was a before and then one irrevocable after. In the before, the injured and beaten always had a chance; in the after, young men lay in his arms with throats torn by shrapnel, pleading with him not to tell their mothers how they had died. In the before, Weigl pretended to be dead in mock battles with his friends; in the after, he watched as a boy from his unit whispered to Vietnamese corpses while caring for their inert bodies as if they were dolls. Weigl returned from Vietnam unprepared to cope with life in the aftermath of war. One day he was squatting in a bunker, high on marijuana and waiting out a rocket attack; two days later he stood in his parents’ house, breathing the old air. For years, he struggled to adjust, sleeping in different rooms each night and leaping at a person’s throat if a hand reached to touch him in his sleep. He turned to alcohol, drugs, and women in an attempt to escape his confused purgatory, but only found himself alone, watching other people’s lives from the shadows. Eventually finding his way back into the world after a long time in a zone between being and not being, Weigl drew solace from poetry and, later, from a family.
Yet, it is not until a harrowing journey back to Hanoi, to adopt a Vietnamese daughter, that Weigl is fully delivered from the brutal legacy of the war. This act of salvation and recompense to a nation he helped to destroy lies at the heart of his memoir and infuses it with a profound sense of humanity and transcendence. Moving from childhood to the war to a final act of compassion and hope, The Circle of Hanh is a powerful recreation of a deeply haunted life and, ultimately, a stunning work of redemption.


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Alligator
A Novel
by Lisa Moore
Moore’s wickedly fresh first novel—a Canadian best seller, winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Canadian and Caribbean region), and a Globe and Mail Book of the Year—moves with the swiftness of an alligator in attack mode through the lives of a group of brilliantly rendered characters mingling in contemporary St. John’s, Newfoundland. St. John’s is a city whose spiritual location is somewhere in the heart of Flannery O’Connor country. Its denizens jostle one another in uneasy arabesques of desire, greed, and ambition, juxtaposed with a yearning for purity, depth, and redemption. Colleen is a seventeen-year-old would-be ecoterrorist, drawn inexorably to the places where alligators thrive. Her mother, Beverly, is cloaked in grief after the death of her husband. Beverly’s sister, Madeleine, is a driven, aging filmmaker who obsesses over completing her magnum opus before she dies. And Frank, a young man whose life is a strange anthology of unpredictable dangers, is desperate to protect his hot-dog stand from sociopathic Russian sailor Valentin, whose predatory tendencies threaten everyone he encounters. Alligator is a remarkable book, a suspenseful, heartfelt, and sexy story that examines the ruthlessly reptilian and painfully human sides of all of us.

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Before He Finds Her
by Michael Kardos
Everyone in the quiet Jersey Shore town of Silver Bay knows the story: on a Sunday evening in September 1991, Ramsey Miller threw a blowout block party, then murdered his beautiful wife and three-year-old daughter.

But everyone is wrong. The daughter got away. Now she is nearly eighteen and tired of living in secrecy. Under the name Melanie Denison, she has spent the last fifteen years in small-town West Virginia as part of the Witness Protection Program. She has never been allowed to travel, go to a school dance, or even have Internet at home. Precautions must be taken at every turn, because Ramsey Miller was never caught and might still be looking for his daughter. Yet despite strict house rules, Melanie has entered into a relationship with a young teacher at the local high school and is now ten weeks pregnant. She doesn’t want her child to live in hiding as she has had to. Defying her guardians and taking matters into her own hands, Melanie returns to Silver Bay in hopes of doing what the authorities have failed to do: find her father before he finds her. Weaving in Ramsey’s story in the three days leading up to the brutal crime, Before He Finds Her is a stirring novel about love and faith and fear— and how the most important things can become terribly distorted when we cling to them too fiercely.


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Shards
A Novel
by Ismet Prcic
Ismet Prcic’s brilliant and provocative debut novel is about a young Bosnian, also named Ismet Prcic, who has fled his war-torn homeland and is now struggling to reconcile his past with his present life in California. He is advised that in order to move forward he must “write everything.” The result is a great rattle bag of memories, confessions, and fictions: sweetly humorous recollections of Ismet’s childhood in Tuzla appear alongside anguished letters to his mother about the challenges of life in this new world. And as Ismet’s foothold in the present falls away, his writings are further complicated by stories from the point of view of another young man—real or imagined—named Mustafa, who joined a troop of elite soldiers and stayed in Bosnia to fight. When Mustafa’s story begins to overshadow Ismet’s New World identity, the reader is charged with piecing together the fragments of a life that has become eerily unrecognizable, even to the one living it.

Shards is a thrilling read—a harrowing war story, a stunningly original coming-of-age novel, and a heartbreaking saga of a splintered family. Remarkable for its propulsive energy and stylistic daring, Shards marks the debut of a gloriously gifted writer.



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Camus, a Romance
by Elizabeth Hawes
Albert Camus is best known for his contribution to twentieth-century literature. But who was he, beneath the trappings of fame? Camus, a Romance reveals the French-Algerian of humble birth; the TB-stricken exile editing the war resistance newspaper Combat; the pied noir in anguish over the Algerian War; the Don Juan who loved a multitude of women. These form only the barest outlines of Camus’s life, which Elizabeth Hawes chronicles alongside her own experience following in his footsteps. Camus, a Romance is at once biography and memoir—wrought with passion and detail, it is the story not only of Camus, but of the relationship between a reader and a most beloved writer.

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The Great Divorce
A Nineteenth-Century Mother's Extraordinary Fight against Her Husband, the Shakers, and Her Times
by Ilyon Woo
Ilyon Woo’s The Great Divorce is the dramatic, richly textured story of one of nineteenth-century America’s most infamous divorce cases, when a young mother single handedly challenged her country’s notions of women’s rights, family, and marriage itself.
       Petite and strong-willed, Eunice daintiness made her the image of femininity, but her brashness set her apart. Married to an alcoholic, abusive husband, Eunice did her best to raise their three children—but when he left home to join the strange, celibate Shakers, Eunice refused to follow. Enraged, her husband snuck home and abducted the children. Eunice was devastated, but determined to obtain a divorce and be reunited with her children. She mounted an epic three-year legal battle that attracted the notice of such luminaries as Thomas Jefferson and Martin Van Buren, and advanced the question of women’s rights in the hearts and minds of many Americans, much as the Amistad case would change the debate on slavery two decades later. Eunice eventually won the first and only legislative divorce in her state’s history—but instead of waiting for the government to reunite her with her children, she rallied a mob and stormed the Shaker village by torchlight to take them back.



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The Betrayal
A Novel
by Helen Dunmore
Internationally acclaimed author Helen Dunmore follows her best-selling novel, The Siege, with a riveting and emotionally absorbing portrait of postwar Soviet Russia, a world of violence and terror where the severest acts of betrayal can come from the most trusted allies.

In 1952 Leningrad, Andrei, a young doctor, and Anna, a nursery school teacher, are forging a quiet life together in the postwar, postsiege wreckage. But they know their happiness is precarious, like that of millions of Russians who must avoid the claws of Stalin’s merciless Ministry of State Security. When Andrei is forced to treat the seriously ill child of a senior secret police officer, his every move is scrutinized and it becomes painfully clear that his own fate, and that of his family, is bound to the child’s. Trapped in an impossible game of life and death, and pitted against a power-mad father’s raging grief, Andrei and Anna must avoid the whispers and watchful eyes of those who will say or do anything to save themselves.

With The Betrayal, Dunmore returns with a powerful and stirring novel of ordinary people in the grip of a terrible and sinister regime, and an evocative tale of a love that will not be silenced.



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Searching for Zion
by Emily Raboteau

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The Cigar Roller
A Novel
by Pablo Medina
Master storyteller Pablo Medina’s The Cigar Roller is a radiant novel recounting the life of Cuban master cigar roller Amadeo Terra. A proud and capricious man, tobacco has been the center of Amadeo’s life, the source of his passion. For his considerable talents with the leaves he had been forgiven a great number of sins. An imperious patriarch of enormous appetites, Amadeo now lies in a Florida hospital after a stroke looks back at his previously unexamined life. One day Nurse feeds him mango from a baby-food jar—a change from the tasteless mush he frequently rejects with defiance—and the taste brings memories of his life in Havana flooding back to him. He recalls his turbulent, passionate relationship with his wife Julia, his numerous romantic transgressions, the three sons he’s kept at a distance, the political strife that forced his family to relocate from Cuba to Florida, and finally the tragedy that he’s kept locked away. The Cigar Roller is a tour de force, an evocative, humorous and endearing and portrait of a once robust man who, at the end of his imperfect life, clamors for some dignity and grace as he comes to terms with his regrets.

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The Lie
by Helen Dunmore
From the award-winning author of The Siege, Helen Dunmore, comes The Lie, a spellbinding tale of love, remembrance, and deception, set against the backdrop of World War I.

Cornwall, 1920. Daniel Branwell has survived the First World War and returned to the small fishing town where he was born. Behind him are the trenches and the most intense relationship of his life. As he works on the land, struggling to make a living in the aftermath of war, he is drawn deeper and deeper into the traumas of the past and memories of his dearest friend and his first love. As the drama unfolds, Daniel is haunted by the terrible, unforeseen consequences of a lie. Set in France during the First World War and in postwar Cornwall, this is a deeply moving and mesmerizing story of the “men who marched away.”



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The Jewish Wife and Other Short Plays
The Jewish Wife; In Search of Justice; The Informer; The Elephant Calf; The Measure Taken; The Exception and the Rule; Sazburg Dance of Death; What Was He Killed For?
by Bertolt Brecht

These six plays represent the best and most humorous of Brecht's shorter works. The Jewish Wife is from the Fear and Misery in the Third Reich cycle of one-act plays, which, along with In Search of Justice and The Informer, chronicles the hardships of life in Nazi Germany. The Exception and the Rule, one of Brecht's most popular short works, grimly depicts the consequences of the mutually dependent—yet inevitably inequitable—relationship between the privileged and the poor; it is included here with The Measures Taken and The Elephant Calf. Though all of these "tales of horror," as Eric Bentley calls them, have tragic undertones, they are also infused with the farcical absurdities and comic irony so characteristic of Brecht's work.


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Prosperous Friends
by Christine Schutt
Described by John Ashbery as “pared down but rich, dense, fevered, exactly right and even eerily beautiful,” Christine Schutt’s prose has earned her comparisons to Emily Dickinson and Eudora Welty. The New York Times Book Review described Schutt’s All Souls as “shot through with [Virginia] Woolf’s lyrical, restless spirit.” In her new novel, Schutt delivers a pitch-perfect, timeless, and original work on the spectacle of love.

Prosperous Friends follows the evolution of a young couple’s marriage as it is challenged by the quandaries of longing and sexual self-discovery. The glam­orous and gifted Ned Bourne and his pretty wife, Isabel, travel to London, New York, and Maine in hopes of realizing their artistic promise, but their quest for sexual fulfillment is less assured. Past lovers and new infatuations, doubt and indifference threaten to bankrupt the marriage. The Bournes’ fan­tasies for their future finally give way to a deepened perspective in the company of an older, celebrated artist, Clive Harris, and his wife, a poet, Dinah Harris. With compassionate insight, Schutt explores the divide between those like Clive and Dinah who seem to prosper in love and those like Ned and Isabel who feel themselves condemned to yearn for it.


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The Train to Warsaw
A Novel
by Gwen Edelman
Jascha and Lilka flee separately from the Warsaw Ghetto in 1942. Years later they are reunited in London, where Jascha has become a celebrated writer, feted for his dark tales about his wartime adventures. One day, forty years after the war, Jascha receives a letter inviting him to give a reading in Warsaw. He tells Lilka that nothing remains of the city they knew, but Lilka, nostalgic for the city of her childhood, prevails. Together, traveling by train through a frozen December landscape, they return to an unrecognizable Warsaw. When they unwittingly find themselves back in what was once the ghetto, they will discover that there are still secrets between them.

A riveting story of the nature of desire and the cost of survival, The Train to Warsaw is a haunting and unforgettable portrait of a man and a woman who cannot escape their past.



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Budapest
A Novel
by Chico Buarque
Not just one of Brazil’s most influential and beloved composers and musicians, Chico Buarque has won high praise as a poet, playwright, and novelist. Now with Budapest, his third novel, he offers a darkly comic social satire and a transcontinental love story of sex, violence, and comedy. Brazilian ghost-writer Jose Costa has just attended the Anonymous Writers Congress in Istanbul and is on his way back to Rio when a technical problem with his Lufthansa flight forces him to spend a night in Budapest. Fascinated by the Hungarian language, he falls under the sway of Kriska, an apparent teacher of the language.  After misadventures in Hungary that include a round of Russian roulette with a couple of gypsies, he returns to Rio to find that his wife has vanished and the entire country is reading a book that he ghost-wrote. Has his wife run off with the author? Costa manages to forget Copacabana and the samba in order to immerse himself in the Hungarian language and nights in Buda. Chico Buarque’s novel coils around the reader like a magical snake from the Arabian Nights—and recalls Borges and Calvino in its literary playfulness.

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The World Beneath
by Cate Kennedy
Cate Kennedy’s first novel is a compassionate and unswerving portrait of a broken family whose members go to extraordinary lengths to reclaim their lives and relationships from the mistakes of the past. Fifteen years after their breakup, Rich and Sandy have settled into the unfulfilling compromises of middle age. To distract themselves from their inadequacies, both cling to the shining moment of their youth, when they met as environmental activists during a world-famous blockade to save Tasmania’s Franklin River. Though their daughter, Sophie, has always remained skeptical of her parents’ ecological fairy tale, when Rich invites her on a backpacking trip through Tasmania for her fifteenth birthday, Sophie sees it as a way to bond with a father she’s never known. As they progress farther into the wilderness, the spell of Rich’s worldly charm soon gives way to Sophie’s suspicion and fear as his overconfidence sets off a chain of events that no one could have predicted. A story of forgiveness and survival, The World Beneath plumbs the depths of family and courage through characters who learn that if they are to endure, they must traverse not only the secret territories that lie between them, but also those within themselves.

 



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Exposure
by Helen Dunmore

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Kamchatka
by Marcelo Figueras
Set against the backdrop of Argentina’s violent military junta in the late 1970s, Kamchatka is a wise, deeply moving drama about broken loyalties and the imaginative spaces we retreat to when we need to make sense of an unimaginable world.

In 1976 Buenos Aires, a ten-year-old boy lives in a world of school lessons and comic books, TV shows and games of Risk—a world in which men have superpowers and boys can conquer the globe on a rectangle of cardboard. But in his hometown, the military has just seized power, and amid a climate of increasing terror and intimidation, people begin to disappear without a trace.

When his mother unexpectedly pulls him and his younger brother from school, she tells him they’re going on an impromptu family trip. But he soon realizes that this will be no ordinary holiday: his parents are known supporters of the opposition, and they are going into hiding. Holed up in a safe house in the remote hills outside the city, the family assumes new identities. The boy names himself Harry after his hero Houdini, and as tensions rise and the uncertain world around him descends into chaos, he spends his days of exile learning the secrets of escape.

Kamchatka is the portrait of a child forced to square fantasy with a reality in which family, politics, history, and even time itself have become more improbable than any fiction. Told from the points of view of Harry as a grown man and as a boy, Kamchatka is an unforgettable story of courage and sacrifice, the tricks of time and memory, and the fragile yet resilient fabric of childhood.


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Home Schooling
Stories
by Carol Windley
Carol Windley’s mesmerizing collection, Home Schooling, introduced an American audience to a mature, masterful storyteller whose “writing has a unique power, a perfect combination of delicacy, intensity, and fearless imagination” (Alice Munro). Set in the temperate rain forests of Vancouver Island and the vibrant cities of the Pacific Northwest, the stories in Home Schooling uncover the hidden freight of families as they dissolve and reform in new and startling configurations: ghosts appear, the past intrudes and overwhelms the present, familiar terrain takes on a hostile aspect, and happiness often depends on unlikely alliances.

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Me and You
by Niccolò Ammaniti
From internationally best-selling author Niccolò Ammaniti, comes a funny, tragic, gut-punch of a novel, charting how an unlikely alliance between two outsiders blows open one family’s secrets. Lorenzo Cumi is a fourteen-year-old misfit. To quell the anxiety of his concerned, socially conscious parents, he tells them he’s been invited on an exclusive ski vacation with the popular kids. On the morning of the trip, Lorenzo demands that his mother drop him off before they arrive at the train station, insisting that his status will be compromised if he shows up accompanied by his mother. Reluctantly, she agrees, and as soon as she is safely out of the vicinity, he turns around and makes his way back to his neighborhood, to put his real plan in motion: for one blessed week, Lorenzo will retreat to a forgotten cellar in his family’s apartment building, where he will live in perfect isolation, keeping the adult world at bay.

But when his estranged half-sister, Olivia, shows up in the cellar unexpectedly, his idyll is shattered, and the two become locked in a battle of wills—forced to confront the very demons they are each struggling to escape.

Evoking the fierce intensity and the pulse-quickening creepiness of I’m Not Scared, Ammaniti’s best-selling first novel, Me and You is a breathtaking tale of alienation, acceptance, and wanting to be loved by “a fearsomely gifted writer” (The Independent).


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The Kindness of Enemies
by Leila Aboulela

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Smuggled
A Novel
by Christina Shea
Sweeping from post–WWII rural Romania to the cosmopolitan Budapest of 1990, Christina Shea’s Smuggled is the story of Eva Farkas, who loses her identity, quite literally, as a young child when she is smuggled in a flour sack across the Hungarian border to escape the Nazis.

Five-year-old Eva is trafficked from Hungary to Romania at the end of the war, arriving in the fictional border town of Crisu, given the name Anca Balaj by her aunt and uncle and instructed never to speak another word of Hungarian again. “Eva is dead,” she is told. As the years pass, Anca proves an unquenchable spirit, with a lust for life even when political forces threaten to derail her at every turn. Time is layered in this quest for self, culminating in the end of the Iron Curtain and Anca’s reclaiming of the name her mother gave her. When Eva returns to Hungary in 1990, a country changing as fast as the price of bread, she meets Martin, an American teacher, and Eva’s lifelong search for family and identity comes full circle as her cross-cultural relationship with Martin deepens through their endeavor to rescue the boy downstairs from abuse.

An intimate look at the effects of history on an individual life, Smuggled is a raw and fearless account of transformation, and a viscerally reflective tale about the basic need for love without claims.



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Wrecked
by Charlotte Roche
Charlotte Roche is one of Europe’s best known and most popular novelists. Her controversial first novel, Wetlands, was an international phenomenon, selling over two million copies in twenty-eight different territories. The New York Times called Wetlands “a cri de coeur against the oppression of a waxed, shaved, douched and otherwise sanitized women’s world,” and other reviewers raved about Roche’s frankness about the female body. Roche’s second novel, Wrecked, is just as raw and powerful as her debut, but is a more mature work that deals with sex, death, fidelity, and the question of what is expected from a twenty-first century wife and mother.

It’s easier to give a blow job than to make coffee.” That’s what Elizabeth Kiehl, mother of seven-year-old Liza, thinks to herself, after a particularly lengthy and inventive bout of sex with her husband Georg, recounted in detail over the book’s first sixteen pages. Elizabeth goes to great efforts to pleasure her husband in the bedroom, and to be a thoughtful and caring mother. But her perfect mother and wife act hides a painful past and a tragic rift in her psyche— the result of a terrible car accident in which her brothers and mother were involved. As a result, Elizabeth’s relationship with Georg is rather unusual: most husbands and wives wouldn’t watch porn together, or go off on joint trips to a local brothel for threesomes with prostitutes while their daughter is at school. A raw, explicit novel from one of Europe’s most controversial voices, Wrecked is literary erotica with a kick.



reading group guide available

When to Walk
by Rebecca Gowers

“Heartening indeed . . . A sharp, literate roman a clef for readers who like their female empowerment free from sentimentality.” —Kirkus Reviews

One part Melissa Bank and another part George Saunders, When to Walk is a laceratingly funny and deeply compassionate take on how one woman reinvents herself and learns that, no matter how late, there can always be a new beginning in life. When Ramble’s husband calls her an “autistic vampire” and abruptly ends their marriage over lunch, she isn’t quite sure what to do. She has no rent money, a looming deadline for work, and new neighbors who seem to have involved her in petty crime. Faced with the dissolution of a life she hadn’t really wanted, Ramble takes stock of what she has left. In Rebecca Gowers’s sharp debut, Ramble begins to reconsider everything her screwy family and unreliable but loyal friends have taught her so far. She spends a week taking apart her life and deciding which parts she wants to keep. Called “a mercurial delight” by the New Statesman and “brilliant . . . unforgettable” by Scotland on Sunday, When to Walk is a disarmingly honest portrayal of a young woman coming into her own—lit with hope, rich in magnificent characters, and hilariously wise.


reading group guide available

Butterflies in November
by Audur Olafsdottir
In Butterflies in November, internationally bestselling author Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir crafts a “funny, moving, and occasionally bizarre exploration of life’s upheavals and reversals” (Financial Times).

After a day of being dumped—twice—and accidentally killing a goose, a young woman yearns for a tropical vacation far away from the chaos of her life. Instead, her plans are thrown off course by her best friend’s four-year-old deaf-mute son, thrust into her reluctant care. But when the boy chooses the winning numbers for a lottery ticket, the two of them set off on a road trip across Iceland with a glove compartment stuffed full of their jackpot earnings. Along the way, they encounter black sand beaches, cucumber farms, lava fields, flocks of sheep, an Estonian choir, a falconer, a hitchhiker, and both of her exes desperate for another chance. As she and the boy grow closer, what began as a spontaneous adventure unexpectedly and profoundly changes the way she views her past and charts her future.

Butterflies in November is a blackly comic, charming, and uplifting tale of friends and lovers, motherhood, and self-discovery.



reading group guide available

Double Happiness
Stories
by Mary-Beth Hughes
Mary-Beth Hughes delivers a seductive, deeply human, and sophisticated story collection about the universal need to be loved and the complicated imperfections that jeopardize the ties that bind us.
          The stories in Double Happiness are extraordinary portrayals of the ordinariness of life. By pinpointing moments of discord when personal needs and morality clash with circumstances beyond our control, Hughes challenges our concepts of responsibility, trust, resilience, and betrayal. In “Pelican Song,” a modern dancer who moonlights as a movie-ticket taker visits her parents’ picturesque home only to discover that her stepfather is abusing her too-accommodating mother; “Horse” follows maladjusted honeymooners in Atlantic City whose weekend is saved from emotional catastrophe by a horse that refuses to dive from its pedestal into the ocean; and in “Rome,” a mini-holiday in New York turns from shopping and tea at the Plaza to a young girl’s sharp discovery of her father’s secret life.
          With an elegant blend of humor and pathos, Hughes captures the turning points in relationships that make us wonder how well we really know the people we love, and ourselves. Double Happiness is a revealing meditation on the fragility of contentment and the lengths we must go to in order to sustain it.


teacher's guide available

Edward II
by Bertolt Brecht

Edward II is, in a sense, Bertolt Brecht's only tragedy. Based on Christopher Marlowe's classic of the same name, it departs from its source as widely as The Threepenny Opera departs from Gay's Beggar's Opera. Brecht has made a multitude of technical changes calculated to streamline the play, with a smaller cast and simpler action, and he has created virtually new and totally compelling characters with his extravagant variations on Anne, Edward's queen, and Mortimer, the villain of the piece. Brecht also reinterprets Marlowe's famously homosexual protagonist, creating an Edward initially more crudely homoerotic and ultimately more truly heroic. Brecht's Edward is a hero for the modern era: an existential hero defying a meaningless universe with his courage.


reading group guide available

Fatal Remedies
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

reading group guide available

Quietly in Their Sleep
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery. First published in Great Britain under the title The Death of Faith
by Donna Leon
In the sixth book featuring Donna Leon’s ever-charming and sympathetic protagonist, Commissario Guido Brunetti comes to the aid of a young nursing sister who has had five patients unexpectedly die and decides to leave her convent. In the course of his inquiries, Brunetti encounters an unusual cast of characters but discovers nothing that seems criminal. Is the nun simply creating a smoke screen to justify abandoning her vocation? Or has she stumbled onto something very real and very sinister—something that places her own life in imminent danger? A beautiful, suspense-filled novel, Quietly in Their Sleep is Donna Leon at the top of her form.

reading group guide available

Dressed for Death
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery. Published previously in the United Kingdom as The Anonymous Venetian
by Donna Leon
Commissario Guido Brunetti’s hopes for a refreshing family holiday in the mountains are once again dashed when a gruesome discovery is made in Marghera – a body so badly beaten the face is completely unrecognizable.  Brunetti searches Venice for someone who can identify the corpse but is met with a wall of silence.  Then he receives a telephone call from a contact who promises some tantalizing information.  And before the night is out, Brunetti is confronting yet another appalling, and apparently senseless, death.

reading group guide available

Death and Judgment
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery. Published previously in the United Kingdom as A Venetian Reckoning.
by Donna Leon
Can the two tragedies possibly be connected? In search of an answer, Commissario Guido Brunetti must dig deep into the secret lives of the once great and good---a quest that leads him to a seedy Venetian bar and a crime network that reches far beyond the laguna. But it will take another violent death in Venice before Brunetti and his colleagues begin to understand what is really going on.

reading group guide available

The Quarry
A Novel
by Damon Galgut

Damon Galgut established himself as a writer of international caliber with the publication of The Good Doctor, which was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the winner of the Commonwealth Writers Prize for the African region. The Quarry, never published outside of South Africa, is another stark, intense, and crystalline novel in which human nature betrays itself against the desolate backdrop of rural South Africa. On a lonely stretch of road, a minister on his way to a new congregation picks up a hitchhiker. The passenger, a fugitive, kills the minister and assumes his identity. As the fugitive and the local police chief play a tense game of cat and mouse, culminating in a pursuit across the desolate veldt, Damon Galgut gives us a spare, devastating combat for man’s most prized attribute: freedom.


teacher's guide available

The Mother
by Bertolt Brecht

Bertolt Brecht's play The Mother is freely adapted from Gorky's world-famous novel of the same name. Brecht tells the story of a working-class mother who is drawn into the struggle for a Bolshevik revolution; in the character of Pelagea Vlassova, the mother of the title, Brecht draws a richly human figure who emerges as the single entirely positive major hero in all of Brecht's dramatic works.
This edition has an extensive introduction by the translator, Lee Baxandall, which gives a detailed history of the play and its first production. In addition, there are twenty-five pages of notes by Brecht himself.


reading group guide available

Light
A Novel
by Margaret Elphinstone

Set on a tiny island off the Isle of Man in 1831, Light is a family drama that reads like a pulse-pounding thriller. Sisters-in-law Lucy and Diya are raising their children together far from prying Victorian eyes, even as they dread the day the outside world will come to their island. That invasion arrives in the form of a surveyor and his assistant, sent to the remote outpost because a new lighthouse must be built and, according to custom of the time, a man must be found to replace the current lighthouse keeper, Lucy.  That Lucy does a man’s job and Diya turns out to be a highly educated Indian woman shocks and confuses the men, but soon romance blossoms. Faced with banishment from the only home she’d ever known, Diya’s hot-headed daughter attempts a terrible act that may lead the family to ruin. With an assured eye for capturing the alien beauty of the island, Margaret Elphinstone creates an empathetic and compassionate tale of two singular women coming to terms with a sea change in their lives.


reading group guide available

Passion Play
by Jerzy Kosinski
William Kennedy has written in The Washington Post that "the Kosinski hero is unique in literature, as recognizable as the Hemingway hero used to be". Passion Play is the story of Fabian, Kosinski's most romantic and driven hero. A modern knight-errant, he roams America in his custom-built VanHome, his refuge, transport, and stable for his two horses. His livelihood is polo -- not the millionaire's team sport, but the life-threatening duel of clashing horsemen. The prize is more than money and honor; it is the awareness of having drawn upon every resource of body and mind, of man and horse in danger. Passion Play is a masterpiece of violence and seduction, love and loss, by one of the world's greatest writers.

reading group guide available

1959
A Novel
by Thulani Davis

Thulani Davis’s 1959 is a rare combination of power and poignance, recalling Carson McCullers as strongly as it does James Baldwin. In its honesty and its deep generosity of spirit, 1959 brings to live a pivotal moment in American history, with all its violence, surprise, and glorious hope.


reading group guide available

Little Caesar
by Tommy Wieringa
From internationally best-selling author Tommy Wieringa comes a rich and engrossing novel about a man on an odyssey in search of answers about his dysfunctional artistic family and the legacy they left behind.

When Ludwig Unger returned to his hometown after a decade, he arrived with a plastic bag filled with his mother’s ashes and little else. He was there to make amends with his lonely past, to say good-bye to the familial ghosts that still haunted him. Raised in a cliff-top cottage on the east coast of England, Ludwig’s mother did her best to create a normal life for her son after her mega­lomaniac husband left them to pursue his art. A mama’s boy, Ludwig grew up in her shadow, developing an obsession with her and her sensual allure. But when he discovered the secret of her past as the world-famous porn star “Eve LaSage” and her plans to stage a comeback, Ludwig’s world spun out of con­trol. He soon found himself homeless, shouldering the shame of his mother’s career, and embarking on a journey that took him around the world from Los Angeles to Prague to El Real.



Little Caesar is a story of beauty and decay, of filial loyalty and parental betrayal, and of the importance, in the end, of self-sacrifice.



teacher's guide available

Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them
by Christopher Durang
Christopher Durang has been called “Jonathan Swift’s nicer, younger brother” (The New York Observer). His plays are known for containing hilarity at every turn and revealing social commentary in every corner. Now collected in Why Torture Is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them and Other Political Plays are Durang’s most revealing political and social satires.

Why Torture Is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them tells the story of a young woman in crisis: Is her new husband, whom she married when drunk, a terrorist? Or just crazy? Or both? Is her father’s hobby of butterfly collecting really a cover for his involvement in a shadow government? Does her mother go to the theater frequently to seek mental escape, or is she just insane? Add in a minister who directs porno, and a ladylike operative whose underwear just won’t stay up, and this black comedy will make us laugh all the way to the waterboarding room.



reading group guide available

The Garden Next Door
by Jose Donoso

A Chilean writer named Julio and his wife, Gloria, are beset by worries, constantly bickering about money, their writing, and their son (who may or may not be plying the oldest trade in Marrakesh). When Julio's boyhood best friend lends the couple his luxurious Madrid apartment for the summer, it is an escape for both—in particular for Julio, who fantasizes about the garden next door and the erotic life of the lovely young aristocrat who inhabits it.


teacher's guide available

Manual of Piety
by Bertolt Brecht

Known primarily as a dramatist, Bertolt Brecht was also a gifted poet. These fifty poems—among them many ballads that later became part of The Threepenny Opera, Mahagonny, and Baal—reveal the tremendous range and versatility of Brecht's expression. His first and best book of poetry, Manual of Piety uses the traditional form of devotional literature to provide an irreverent spoof and a serious critique of the post-World War I European (and, more specifically, German) culture that gave rise to fascism. His characteristically sly wit combines with mordant social commentary to make Manual of Piety Brecht at his most hilarious—and also his most brutally incisive.


teacher's guide available

Jungle of the Cities and Other Plays
Jungle of Cities; Drums in the Night; Roundheads and Peakheads
by Bertolt Brecht

The three plays gathered in this volume are among Bertolt Brecht's most remarkable; the best-known is Jungle of Cities, here translated by poet Anselm Hollo. Set in Chicago in a climate of rampant capitalism, it is the story of a savage battle waged between two men, whose relationship is at once homosexual and sadomasochistic and whose tightly choreographed hostility is a metaphor for their cultural surround.


reading group guide available

Friends in High Places
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

reading group guide available

A Sea of Troubles
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon
Donna Leon has amassed devoted fans around the world for her atmospheric and intelligent Commissario Brunetti series. A Sea of Troubles offers a rare glimpse into the scrupulous Commissario’s personal life. When Brunetti investigates the murder of two local fishermen on the island of Pellestrina, the small community closes ranks, forcing him to accept Signorina Elettra’s offer to visit her relatives there to search for clues. Though loyal to his beloved wife, Paola, he must admit that less-than-platonic emotions underlie his concern for his boss’s beautiful secretary. Suspenseful, provocative, and deeply unsettling, A Sea of Troubles is an explosive and irresistible addition to Leon’s marvelous series.


reading group guide available

Willful Behavior
A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery
by Donna Leon

<September 2016>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28

Anna Noyes
Goodnight, Beautiful Women

9:50 AM-10:35 AM: HOLLIHOCK WRITERS CONFERENCE
715 Purchase St
New Bedford, MA


29

Tim Murphy
Christodora

7:30 PM: GREENLIGHT BOOKSTORE
686 Fulton Street
Brooklyn, NY


30

Rob Spillman
All Tomorrow's Parties

AUGUSTA COLLEGE
1120 15th Street
Augusta, GA


31

Rob Spillman
All Tomorrow's Parties

7:00 PM: SEERSUCKER LIVE!
The Tin Curtain Episode
Sulfur Studios
2301 Bull Street
Savannah, GA


1

Rob Spillman
All Tomorrow's Parties

7:00 PM: AVID BOOKSHOP
493 Prince Ave.
Athens, GA


2

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

DECATUR BOOK FESTIVAL
601 W. Ponce de Leon Ave.
Decatur, GA


3

Rob Spillman
All Tomorrow's Parties

4:15 PM-5:00 PM: AJC DECATUR BOOK FESTIVAL
Decature Library
Presented by WABE
Atlanta, GA


4



5



6



7

Viet Thanh Nguyen
Sympathizer, The

OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN
TK
Los Angeles, CA


8

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

7:00 PM-8:00 PM: NEW SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
co-sponsored by McNally Jackson
66 West 12th Street
New York, NY


John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

8:00 PM-10:00 PM: RECEPTION
The New School University Center
Starr Foundation Hall
63 Fifth Ave (between 13th and 14th St)
New York, NY


John Bloom
Eccentric Orbits

07:00 PM: BOOKS INCI N MOUNTAIN VIEW
301 Castro Street
San Fran/San Jose/Oakland, CA


9



10

Rob Spillman
All Tomorrow's Parties

1:30 PM-2:30 PM: SLICE LITERARY WRITERS CONFERENCE
Feature Talk
St Francis College
Founders Hall
Brooklyn, NY


11



12



13

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: MALAPROP'S BOOKSTORE & CAFE
55 Haywood Street
Asheville, North Carolina


Tim Murphy
Christodora

6:30 PM-8:00 PM: KRAMER BOOKS & AFTERWORDS
1517 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, DC


14

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

7:00 PM: HARVARD BOOKSTORE
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Boston/Cambridge, MA


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: REGULATOR BOOKSHOP
720 Ninth Street
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Tim Murphy
Christodora

7:00 PM: BROOKLINE BOOKSMITH
279 Harvard St.
Boston/Cambridge, MA


15

Anna Noyes
Goodnight, Beautiful Women

7:30 PM: PETE'S CANDY STORE
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Brooklyn, NY


John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

5:30 PM: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ANN ARBOR
Helmut Stern Auditorium in Museum of Art
525 State Street
Ann Arbor, MI


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: QUAIL RIDGE BOOKS
3522 Wade Avenue
Raleigh/Durham/Chap Hill, NC


Tim Murphy
Christodora

5:30 PM: BROWN UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
71 Olive Street
Providence, RI


16

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

2:00 PM-3:30 PM: NATIONAL ENDOWMENT OF THE HUMANITIES
Paramount Theatre
215 E Main Street
Charlottesville, VA


Tim Murphy
Christodora

4:00 PM: PROVINCETOWN BOOK FESTIVAL
Provincetown Bookshop
246 Commercial Street
Provincetown, MA


17

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

11:00 AM-12:00 PM: NEW DOMINION BOOKSHOP
404 East Main Street
Charlottesville, VA


18

Rob Spillman
All Tomorrow's Parties

12:00 PM: BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL
Remember All That? A Look Back at NYC
Brooklyn Historical Society Library
128 Pierrepont St.
Brooklyn, NY


Tim Murphy
Christodora

12:00 PM: BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL
Remember All That? A Look Back at NYC
Brooklyn Historical Society Library
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY


19

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

07:00 PM: MAGERS & QUINN BOOKSELLERS
3038 Hennepin Avenue South
Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: BOSWELL'S BOOKS
Arms Library 60 Bridge Street
Shelburne Falls, MA


20

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

6:00 PM: SEMINARY COOP
5751 S Woodlawn Ave
Chicago, IL


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: BROOKLINE BOOKSMITH
279 Harvard St.
Boston/Cambridge, MA


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Christodora

7:30 PM-8:30 PM: SKYLIGHT BOOKS
1818 North Vermont Ave.
Los Angeles, CA


21

Anna Noyes
Goodnight, Beautiful Women

6:00 PM-9:00 PM: NEIBA NEW ENGLAND BOOK AWARDS
Biltmore Hotel
Biltmore Hotel
11 Dorrance Street
Providence, R


John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

7:00 PM: LANNAN CENTER
Lensic Performing Arts Center
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Santa Fe, NM


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: BARNES & NOBLE
150 East 86th Street
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Tim Murphy
Christodora

7:00 PM: CITY LIGHTS BOOKSELLERS
261 Columbus Avenue
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22



23

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

7:00 PM: GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY
Copley Formal Lounge
3700 O St NW
Washington, DC


Tim Murphy
Christodora

7:00 PM: RAKESTRAW BOOKS
4 Railroad Ave
Danville Square
Danville, CA


24

Viet Thanh Nguyen
Sympathizer, The

4:00 PM-5:00 PM: JAIPUR LITERARY FESTIVAL
In conversation with Andrew Lam and Amitava Kumar
Boulder Public Library
Boulder, CO


Viet Thanh Nguyen
Sympathizer, The

6:30 PM-7:30 PM: JAIPUR LITERARY FESTIVAL
In conversation with Robert Blackwill, Helen Thorp
Boulder Public Library
Boulder, CO


Marc Wortman
1941: Fighting the Shadow War

PACIFIC AVIATION MUSEUM
319 Lexington Ave
Honolulu, HI


25



26

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: TATTERED COVER BOOKSTORE
1628 16th Street
Denver, CO


Tim Murphy
Christodora

7:00 PM: THIRD PLACE BOOKS - SEWARD PARK
co-sponsored by Hugo House
5041 Wilson Ave South
Seattle, WA


27

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:30 PM: BOULDER BOOKSTORE
1107 Pearl Street
Boulder, CO


28

Tim Murphy
Christodora

7:30 PM: POWELL'S BOOKS
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29

Viet Thanh Nguyen
Sympathizer, The

7:00 PM-8:30 PM: GLENDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY
One Book / One Glendale
222 E Harvard St
Glendale, CA


John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

6:00 PM: TULANE CENTER FOR SOUTHERN STUDIES
Ashe Power House Theatre
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New Orleans, LA


Tim Murphy
Christodora

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30

Viet Thanh Nguyen
Sympathizer, The

06:30 PM: JONATHAN CLUB
"Meet the Author"
545 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA


1

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

3:30 PM-6:00 PM: LIGHTHOUSE
Visiting Author Series: What Are You Looking At?
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Denver, CO


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

01:30 PM: GRANITE CITY SIX MILE REGIONAL LIBRARY DISTRICT CE
Downtown Library at 2001 Delmar Avenue
Granite City, IL


2

Tim Murphy
Christodora

1:30 PM-2:45 PM: MILFORD READERS AND WRITERS FESTIVAL
Location tk
Milford, PA


3

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: MADISON CENTRAL LIBRARY
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Madison, WI


4

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: BOSWELL BOOK COMPANY
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Rabih Alameddine
Angel of History, The

7:00 PM: CITY LIGHTS BOOKSELLERS
261 Columbus Avenue
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5

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

7:30 PM: WOMEN & CHILDREN FIRST
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6

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

7:30 PM: GOSHEN COLLEGE
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Newcomer 19
Goshen, IN


Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

07:00 PM: LEFT BANK BOOKS
St. Louis Public Library, Schalfly Branch
225 N. Euclid Ave.
St. Louis, MO


Patrick Hoffman
Every Man a Menace

MYSTERIOUS BOOKSHOP
58 Warren St
New York City


7

John Freeman
Freeman's: Family

5:00 PM: PRAIRIE LIGHTS BOOKSTORE
Iowa City Book Festival
15 S. Dubuque St.
Iowa City, IA


8

Robert Olen Butler
Perfume River

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL
Iowa City, IA


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